Musings

Critical Notes Series: Stutschewsky's Kaddish 

I was recently asked to review several editions on Jewish themes. One of the works on the list was Joachim ​Stutschewsky's Kaddish. Stutschewsky was a Ukrainian-Jewish cellist, composer, arranger, and a great promoter of Jewish music in the 20th century. The Kaddish was composed in 1957 in Tel-Aviv and published by OR-TAV Music Publications in 1970. Stutschewsky's Kaddish is a harmonization of the chant sung before the Neilah service on Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement). The same melody was harmonized by Maurice Ravel in 1914. 

The holograph manuscript cover title and copyright information are handwritten in ink by the composer at the end: Tel-Aviv, 30/9/1957. A copy of the holograph is housed at the Martha Blakeney Hodges Collection at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, inscribed to Maurice Eisenberg by the composer, dated 1961

OR-TAV Music Publications has re-engraved their edition on the Finale music notation software. The original 1970 engraving is now out of print. This is the evaluation of Stutschewsky's Kaddish as it is currently available from OR-TAV Music Publication both printed and digital. Special thank you to the Martha Blakeney Hodges Collection for making the original sources available for comparison.

m. 3 - piano LH missing courtesy bass clef for the lower voice (erroneously missing in the manuscript, too)
m. 4 - piano missing diminuendo
m. 6 - piano LH missing a p on beat 2  
m. 6 - cello part note 3 must be a C-natural, not a C#.
m. 8 - piano LH needs a double dot on note 1 and a 16th note on note 2 
m. 8 - cello part has a mf in the manuscript (MS)
m. 10 - piano LH sloppy notation on note 1 


m. 10 in OR-TAV (new edition)


My suggestion

m. 13 - piano LH sloppy notation on note 1 
m. 15 - piano LH sloppy notation on note 1 
m. 15 - first edition cello part has an "a tempo." The MS and first edition score do not have this marking.
m. 18 - piano LH sloppy notation on note 1 
m. 21 - piano LH beat 4 needs a B-flat grace note, not a B-natural 
m. 22 - piano LH missing bass clef on beat 3 
m. 22 - piano LH beat 4 has an unnecessary rest, and it is sloppily placed 
m. 24 - piano LH sloppy notation on note 1 
m. 25 - piano LH beat 3 has a D above the G on the 8th note in the MS 
m. 26 - piano LH has a cresc. hairpin on beats 3-4 in the MS 
m. 27 - staff collision 
m. 27 - cello part does not have a note on beat 5 in the MS
m. 30 - piano RH beat 1 rest is misplaced 
m. 31 - beats 1-2 have a dim. hairpin in the cello and piano parts in the MS 
m. 32 - piano LH sloppy notation on note 1 
m. 34 - cello part only has the top D's in the MS. The first edition has the lower voice, too.
m. 35-37 - piano LH sloppy notation on note 1 
mm. 35-37 - piano part has tenuto marks on beats 3-4 
m. 37 - piano LH sloppy notation on beat 2 
m. 38 - m. 10 - piano LH sloppy notation on beats 1 and 3 
m. 43 - the hairpin must be on the piano LH starting on beat 3. mp dim. missing on beat 2 
m. 48 - first edition cello part has a staccato mark. MS and first edition score do not have this mark.
m. 48 - piano RH sloppy accidental placement on beat 1 

m. 48 - piano LH beat 4 B-flat must be tied to the next measure 
m. 49 - piano LH sloppy notation on note 1 
m. 50 - piano part has a p on beat 2 in the MS 
mm. 51-52 - piano LH missing 8th rest on beat 1 
m. 53 - piano RH missing a tied over F from m.52 
m. 53 - piano LH beat 1 note F is a half note in the MS 
m. 54 - piano RH rests are not in the MS 
m. 55 - piano half notes have accent marks in the MS 
m. 55 - piano LH beat 1 missing a courtesy natural on note F 
m. 56 - piano note 1 in both hands has an accent mark. 
m. 56 - piano part beat 2 has a marcato under note 2 in the MS
m. 56 - piano RH beat 3, note 2 of the triplet, the middle voice has a C# instead of a D in the MS 


m. 56 in the manuscript

m. 57 - cello part has a dim. hairpin instead of the cresc. in the MS

Maurice Eisenberg's Concert Schedule 

Born in Konigsberg of Polish parents, [Maurice] Eisenberg (1900-1972) was brought to the United States by his family when he was two years old. After early training in Baltimore, he played in the Philadelphia Orchestra before becoming principal cellist of the New York Symphony at the age of 18. In 1921, Eisenberg had the opportunity to play for Pablo Casals, who was touring the U.S. This meeting proved to be a turning point in Eisenberg's life because, with Casals' encouragement, he went to Europe the following year to continue his advanced training. Although he studied with Julius Klengel, Hugo Becker, Nadia Boulanger, and Diran Alexanian, Casals was his most important mentor, and they became lifelong friends. 

Eisenberg spent the years between 1926-1939 playing and teaching in Europe. He was well known for his interpretation of the Bach Suites, but his repertoire also included much twentieth-century music. He was a member of the Menuhin Trio and was the founder and artistic director of the London International Violoncello Center. Eisenberg held teaching positions at the Ecole Normale de Musique in Paris (where he succeeded Alexanian as professor of the Casals Class), the Longy School of Music in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and during the last ten years of his life, the International Summer Courses in Cascais, Portugal. His book, Cello Playing of Today, first published in 1957, is now in its fifth edition. At the time of his death in 1972, Eisenberg was Professor of the Cello at the Juilliard School of Music. (Biography from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro)

I would like to present Eisenberg's concert schedule below for anyone who is interested in learning about how a leading cellist and pedagogue helped codify the cello repertoire in the twentieth-century United States. The information is taken from historic newspapers and concert programs from various archives.

12 February 1914 (Baltimore)
Concert sponsored by the Young Men's Hebrew Association at the Old Masonic Temple, accompanied by E. Lester Man.

8 May 1914 (Baltimore)
Played at the Peabody Exhibition Concert with other advanced Conservatory students.

15 December 1914 (Baltimore)
Played at the Madison Street Synagogue as Hanukkah entertainment. Violinist Benjamin Eisenberg also participated. 

28 February 1915 (Baltimore)
Played a recital with pianist Helen Kinsman at the Enoch Pratt Library (Branch No. 12).
Grützmacher - Nocturne [Op. 32, No. 1]
Corelli - Sarabande [Op. 5, No. 8]
Godard - Berceuse from Jocelyn
Martini - Gavotte
Works for piano by Beethoven, Staub, Liszt, and Chopin

28 March 1915 (Baltimore) 
Played a recital with organist Ethel Lustnauer at the Columbia Avenue Methodist Church.
Goltermann - Andante from Cello Concerto No. 3
Works for organ by Borowski, Widor, J.S. Bach, and Hollins

25 April 1915 (Baltimore)
Participated in the sacred concert by the Meyerbeer Singing Society at the Jewish Educational Alliance Building. Violinist Benjamin Eisenberg also participated. 

25 July 1915 (Baltimore)
Played on a recital with organist Harold D. Phillips at the Peabody Conservatory.
Bargiel - Adagio, Op. 38
Goltermann - Andante from Cello Concerto No. 3
Popper - Mazurka [Op. 11, No. 3]
Works for organ by Beethoven, Weber, Tchaikovsky

3 February 1916 (Elkton, Maryland)
Played for the Women's Club of Elkton at the Mechanics' Hall with pianist Esther Cutchin and soprano Mary E. Sharp (sponsored by Peabody).
Grützmacher  - Nocturne [Op. 32, No. 1]
Bruch - Kol Nidrei, Op. 47
Popper - Mazurka [Op. 11, No. 3] 
Works for piano by Chopin, Aliabiev, Arensky, Schumann, and Saint-Saens. Songs by Haydn, Verdi, Cadman, Lehman, Laforge, Sinding, Homer, Horn, and Arne.

4 February 1916 (York, Pennsylvania)
Played for the Women's Club of York at the Country Club of York with pianist Esther Cutchin and soprano Mary E. Sharp (sponsored by Peabody). The proceeds went to war relief in Poland.
Grützmacher - Nocturne [Op. 32, No. 1]
Bruch - Kol Nidrei, Op. 47
Popper - Mazurka [Op. 11, No. 3]
Works for piano by Chopin, Aliabiev, Arensky, Schumann, and Saint-Saens. Songs by Haydn, Verdi, Cadman, Lehman, Laforge, Sinding, Homer, Horn, and Arne.

13 February 1916 (Baltimore)
Played on a recital with organist Anne H. Peterson at Peabody.
Bargiel - Adagio, Op. 38
Massenet - Elegie
Godard - Berceuse from Jocelyn
Popper - Mazurka [Op. 11, No. 3]
Work for organ by Buck, Schumann, Boëllmann, Bartlett, and Smart.

20 November 1916 (Baltimore)
Played Bargiel's Adagio, Op. 38 after a speech by Rabbi Schulman at the Hebrew Benevolent Society.

21 December 1916 (Baltimore)
Played for the Hanukkah presentation for the Sisterhood of the Madison Avenue Temple.

26 May 1917 (Baltimore)
Played at an awards ceremony at Peabody with other advanced students.

22 July 1917 (Baltimore)
Played at an open-air service at Pro-Cathedral. Eisenberg was already in the Baltimore Symphony at this point.

12 April 1921 (Washington DC)
Played a joint recital with pianist Louis Potter at the Mew Masonic Temple Auditorium. Eisenberg was accompanied by Gertrude McRae. Eisenberg was a member of the New York Symphony Orchestra at this point.
Boëllmann - Variations Symphoniques, Op. 23
Bruch - Kol Nidrei, Op. 47
Popper - Gavotte, Op. 23
Chausson/Ronchini - Poème de l'amour et de la mer, Op. 19
Rimsky-Korsakov/Schroeder - Song of India from Sadko
Saint-Saens - Allegro Appassionato, Op. 43
Saint-Saens - Swan from the Carnival of the Animals (encore)

5 February 1922 (New York)
Provided music at the Lafayette Avenue Presbyterian Church at services. He played Andante Moderato from an unspecified piece by Saint-Saens with organist John Hyatt Brewer and Andante Cantabile by Tchaikovsky as part of a string quartet.

18 February 1926 (London debut)
Recital at the Aeolian Hall with pianist Clarence Raybould.
Locatelli/Piatti - Sonata (from Op. 6, Nos. 6 and 12)
Bach - Suite No. 6, BWV 1012
Boccherini - Cello Sonata [No. 6?]

7 December 1926 (London)
Recital at the Aeolian Hall with pianist Clarence Raybould.

15 November 1926 (Berlin)
Played a recital including works by Debussy, Ravel, and Couperin.

15 November 1930 (Berlin)
Recital at the Sing-akademie. Below is an incomplete recital program.
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Davydov - At the Fountain, Op. 20, No. 2
Granados - Spanish Dance [No. 5]

29 November 1930 (London)
Recital

24 May 1931 (London) 
Recital

20 October 1931 (Barcelona)
Recital

9 February 1932 (London)
Recital at Wigmore Hall

12 February 1932 (London)
Premiere of Julian (Julius) Krein's Cello Concerto, Op. 25.

22 February 1933 (Bournemouth)
Played Dvořak's Cello Concerto with Bournemouth Municipal Symphony with conductor Sir Dan Godfrey.

12 Feb 1934 (London)
Played Bloch's Schelomo with the London Philharmonic Orchestra with Bloch conducting.

14 February 1934 (Bournemouth)
British premiere of Glazunov's Concerto-Ballata, Op. 108, conducted by Sir Dan Godfrey.

30 January 1935 (Bournemouth)
Played Bloch's Schelomo with the Bournemouth Municipal Symphony with conductor, conducted by Richard Austin

4 February 1935 (London)
Recital at Wigmore Hall, accompanied by George Reeves
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Fauré - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 117
Valentini/Piatti - Sonata in E major (Allettamento Op. 8, No. 10)

24 January 1936 (London) 
Recital at Wigmore Hall, accompanied by George Reeves
Bach - Suite No. 1, BWV 1007
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 1, Op. 38

7 February 1936 (Paris)
French premiere of Arnold Bax's Sonatine at Salle Grevin, accompanied by Lelia Gousseau.

10 October 1936 (Torquay)
Played Dvořak's Cello Concerto with the Torquay Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Ernest Goss.

10 March 1937 (London)
Recital at Wigmore Hall, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn.

8 October 1937 (Belfast)
Recital at the British Music Society of Northern Ireland, accompanied by Harry Isaacs.

11 October 1937 (London) 
Played on a recital at Wigmore Hall with pianist Cecile Simon and violinist Yvonne Astruc.
Simon - Poeme for Violin, Cello, and Piano
Ravel - Sonata for Violin and Cello
Fauré - Violin Sonata No. 1, Op. 13

22 December 1937 (Bergen, New Jersey)
Solo with Bergen County Orchestra.

27 December 1937 (New York)
Recital at the Town Hall.

7 January 1938 (Baltimore)
Recital at the Peabody Conservatory.
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Valentini/Piatti - Sonata in E major (Allettamento Op. 8, No. 10)
de Laserna/Cassadó - Tonadilla
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1
Howe - Ballade Fantasque

25 March 1938 (London)
Recital at Wigmore Hall, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn.

18 May 1938 (Paris)
Played the Boccherini/Grützmacher Cello Concerto with the Orchestre de l'Association des Concerts Colonne, conducted by Charles Miller.

30 January 1939 (Scranton, Pennsylvania)
Solo with the Anthracite Philarmonic Orchestra at the Masonic Temple Theatre, conducted by Felix M. Gatz.

14 February 1939 (Montclair, New Jersey)
Played Dvořak's Cello Concerto with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra at the Mount Hebron Junior High School, conducted by Rene Pollain.

26 February 1939 (New York)
Recital at the Town Hall.

4 March 1939 (New York) 
Recital at the Town Hall.

24 January 1940 (Danbury, Connecticut)
Premiere of Donald Tweedy's Cello Sonata with Harry Kaufman.

26 January 1940 (New York)
Recital at the Town Hall.

29 February 1940 (West Orange, New Jersey)
Recital at the Carteret School for Boys.

17 March 1940 (Austin, Texas)
Recital in the Hogg Auditorium, accompanied by Ruth Penick Pickard.
Cassadó - Toccata in the Style of Frescobaldi
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102
Bach - Suite No. 6, BWV 1012 (Prelude, Sarabande, and Gavottes)
Bréval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5
Fauré/Casals - Après un rêve, Op. 7, No. 1
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Haydn/Piatti - Minuet from Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6)
Granados/Cassadó - Intermezzo from Goyescas
Senaille/Salmon - Allegro spiritoso from Violin Sonata, Op. 10, No. 4

26 March 1940 (Raleigh, North Carolina)
Recital with Joseph Battista at the Memorial Auditorium, sponsored by the Raleigh Woman's Club.

26 November 1940 (Stillwater, Oklahoma)
Solo with the Oklahoma A and M Orchestra, conducted by Frank Hladky. The first half of the concert was with orchestra and the second was with piano accompaniment with James Stephenson.

30 November 1940 (Clinton, South Carolina)
Recital at the Presbyterian College, accompanied by Harry Kaufman.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Breval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5
Bornschein - Appalachian Legend (US Premiere)
Haydn/Piatti - Minuet from Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6)
Sarasate - Zapateado, Op. 23, No. 2
Chopin - Nocturne 
de Laserna/Cassadó - Tonadilla
Granados/Cassadó - Intermezzo from Goyescas 
Davydov - At the Fountain, Op. 20, No. 2

3 December 1940 (Maryville, Tennessee)
Recital with Joseph Battista at the Maryville College)
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Boëllmann - Variations Symphoniques, Op. 23
Chopin - Nocturne
de Laserna/Cassadó - Tonadilla
Granados/Cassadó - Intermezzo from Goyescas 
Davydov - At the Fountain, Op. 20, No. 2
The program also included works for solo piano by Chopin, Liszt, Rachmaninov, Debussy, and Shostakovich.

9 December 1940 (Seattle)
Solo with the Seattle Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Nikolai Sokoloff.

12 December 1940 (Provo, Utah)
Solo with the Brigham Young University Orchestra, conducted by Leroy Robertson.

10 February 1941 (Baltimore)
Recital at Peabody, accompanied by Harry Kaufman.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Boccherini/Grützmacher - Cello Concerto in B-flat major
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102
Bornschein - Appalachian Legend
Fauré/Casals - Après un rêve, Op. 7, No. 1 (encore)
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165 (encore)
Davydov - At the Fountain, Op. 20, No. 2 (encore)

17-18 February 1941 (Montclair, New Jersey) 
Played Haydn's Cello Concerto in D major and Strauss's Don Quixote with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra at the Mount Hebron Junior High School, conducted by Frieder Weissmann, William Primrose on viola

28 March 1941 (Montclair, New Jersey) 
Informal concert at John Kremer's home hosted by the New Jersey Chamber Music Society. Other musicians included Kenneth Deane, John Cataldo, Gerard Glaubitz, and Dorothy Chapman.
Elliot Griffis - String Quartet No. 2, Allegro
Bach - Sarabande from an unspecified Suite.

1 December 1941 (Hartsville, South Carolina)
Recital at the Coker College Auditorium sponsored by Hartville Music Study and the Coker College.

15 February 1942 (Indianapolis)
Joint recital with soprano Jean Tennyson as part of the Wabash Valley Concert Series.

16 February 1942 (Chicago)
Played 2 movements of the Boccherini/Grützmacher Concerto with the WGN Symphony Orchestra for a program "Music that Endures."

26 February 1942 (New York)
Recital at the Town Hall, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Boccherini/Grützmacher - Cello Concerto in B-flat major
Julian Krein - Andante from Cello Concerto, Op. 25
Fauré/Casals - Après un rêve, Op. 7, No. 1
Debussy - unnamed piece

12-13 March 1942 (Los Angeles)
Played the Schumann Cello Concerto, Op. 129 with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, conducted by George Szell.

29 July 1942 (New York)
Played Saint-Saens's Cello Sonata No. 1, Op. 32 over the radio for WABC, collaborated with Isidor Philipp.

29 November 1942 (Millburn, New Jersey)
Recital at the Millburn Arts Center

18 December 1942 (New York)
8th Jubilee concert at the Hunter College

4-5 January 1943 (Chikisha, Oklahoma)
Recital

12 January 1943 (Provo, Utah)
Solo with the Brigham Young University Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leroy Robertson.
Boccherini/Grützmacher - Cello Concerto in B-flat major
Bach - Suite No. 6, BWV 1012

17 January 1943 (Los Angeles) 
Haydn's Concerto in D major with the Hancock Ensemble at the Hancock Auditorium at the University of Southern California.

19 January 1943 (Los Angeles)
Recital at the Hancock Auditorium at the University of Southern California.

24 January 1943 (Stillwater, Oklahoma) 
Recital, accompanied by Mable Murphy

7-8 February 1943 (Red Springs, North Carolina)
Recital at Flora Macdonald College, accompanied by Alexander Wilalta.

April 1943 (Los Angeles) 
Recital with the Hancock Ensemble at the University of Southern California.

9 April 1943 (Waterbury, Connecticut)
Played Beethoven's Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69 for a radio broadcast (WATR)

9 April 1943 (Waterbury, Connecticut) 
Played Brahms's Cello Sonata No. 1, Op. 38 for a radio broadcast (WATR)

2 May 1943 (Los Angeles)  
Recital with violinist Anton Maaskof and pianist John Crown at the University of Southern California.
Brahms - Violin Sonata No. 2, Op. 100
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Brahms - Trio No. 2, Op. 87

6 May 1943 (Los Angeles) 
Recital at the Hancock Auditorium at the University of Southern California.
Schubert - Arpeggione Sonata, D. 821
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102
Haydn/Piatti - Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6)

17 October 1943 (New York)
Recital at the Town Hall, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn
Moor - Prelude, Op. 123
Bach - Suite No. 6, BWV 1012
Bloch - Prayer from Jewish Life
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1
Haydn/Piatti - Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6)
Chopin - Cello Sonata, Op. 65
Unspecified works by Fuleihan and Weber

19 November 1943 (Evansville, Indiana)
Joint recital with Percy Grainger at the Bosse High School Auditorium. Eisenberg was accompanied by Dorothy Wittich.
Cassadó - Toccata in the Style of Frescobaldi
Chopin - Nocturne
Boccherini - Rondo from String Quintet in C major
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009 (Prelude, Sarabande, Bourrees)
Fauré/Casals - Après un rêve, Op. 7, No. 1
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Davydov - At the Fountain, Op. 20, No. 2

30 November 1943 (Newark, New Jersey)
Played Haydn's Cello Concerto in D major with the National Symphony of Washington DC at the Mosque Theatre, conducted by Hans Kindler. The concert also included Shostakovich's Fifth Symphony.

4 January 1944 (Provo, Utah)
Played Haydn's Cello Concerto in D major with the Brigham Young University Orchestra, conducted by Leroy Robertson. The concert also included Bach's Suite No. 3, BWV 1009.

21 April 1944 (Los Angeles)  
Recital with the Hancock Ensemble at the University of Southern California.

31 March 1944 (Philadelphia)
Recital at the Barclay Ballroom, presented by the Philadelphia Musical Academy, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn.
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 1, Op. 38
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Stravinsky - Suite Italienne
Bloch - Prayer from Jewish Life
Boccherini - Rondo from String Quintet in C major
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Davydov - At the Fountain, Op. 20, No. 2

18 April 1944 (Newark, New Jersey)
Recital at Fuld Hall, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102
Unspecified work by Schubert

27 April 1944 (Philadelphia)
Recital presented by the Philadelphia Musical Academy

16 October 1944 (Williamsburg)
Recital at the College of William and Mary

22 November 1944 (Philadelphia)
Recital with pianist Joseph Schwarz, violinist Jani Szanto, and violist Erwin Groer.
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 1, Op. 38
Brahms - Piano Trio No. 3, Op. 101
Brahms - Piano Quartet No. 2, Op. 26

29 November 1944 (Montreal)
Recital at the Quebec Provincial Conservatory with Isidor Philipp
Saint-Saens - Cello Sonata No. 1, Op. 32
Philipp - Les Cygnes Noirs
Philipp - Serenade Grotesque
Saint-Saens - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 123

13 December 1944 (Philadelphia) 
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium with pianist Joseph Schwarz, violinist Jani Szanto, and violist Erwin Groer. 
Brahms - Violin Sonata No. 1, Op. 78
Brahms - Piano Trio No. 2, Op. 87
Brahms - Piano Quartet No. 3, Op. 60

17 December 1944  (New York)
Recital at the Brooklyn Museum, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69 
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102
Bach - Suite No. 5, BWV 1011 (Prelude, Courante, Sarabande, Gavottes)
Philipp - Les Cygnes Noirs 
Haydn/Piatti - Minuet from Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6) 
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Senaille/Salmon - Allegro spiritoso from Violin Sonata, Op. 10, No. 4

3 January 1945 (Philadelphia)
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69 
Stravinsky - Suite Italienne
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009 
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102
Haydn/Piatti - Minuet from Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6) 
Granados/Cassadó - Intermezzo from Goyescas
Senaille/Salmon - Allegro spiritoso from Violin Sonata, Op. 10, No. 4
Philipp - Les Cygnes Noirs 
Philipp - Serenade Grotesque

20 January 1945 (Philadelphia)  
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium with pianist Joseph Schwarz, violinist Jani Szanto, and violist Carlton Cooley.  
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99
Brahms - Viola Sonata No. 2, Op. 120, No. 2
Brahms - VIolin Sonata No. 3, Op. 108

2 February 1945 (Newark, New Jersey)
Recital at the Newark Academy

14 March 1945 (Philadelphia)  
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium with pianist Joseph Schwarz, violinist Jani Szanto, violist Trude Gundert, contralto Lyuba Senderowna, and clarinetist Walter Cochrane.
Brahms - Alto Songs, Op. 91
Brahms - Clarinet Sonata No. 1, Op. 120, No. 1
Brahms - Clarinet Trio, Op. 114
Brahms - Violin Sonata No. 2, Op. 100

10 April 1945 (New York) 
Recital at the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences with pianist Erno Balogh and violinist Roman Totenberg.
Beethoven - Violin Sonata No. 9 "Kreutzer," Op. 47
Debussy - Cello Sonata
Schubert - Piano Trio No. 2, Op. 100

17 April 1945 (New York)
Recital at the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences with pianist Erno Balogh and violinist Roman Totenberg.
Mozart - Violin Sonata, K. 454
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Villa-Lobos - Piano Trio No. 3

24 April 1945 (New York) 
Recital at the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences with pianist Erno Balogh and violinist Roman Totenberg. 
Milhaud - Violin Sonata No. 2 
Chopin - Cello Sonata, Op. 65
Brahms - Piano Trio No. 1, Op. 8

28 April 1945 (Millburn, New Jersey)
Recital at the Millburn High School Auditorium, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn.

11 May 1945 (Philadelphia)   
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium with pianist Joseph Schwarz, violinist Jani Szanto, violinist Albert Busilow, violist Trude Gundert, and clarinetist Walter Cochrane. 
Brahms - Clarinet Quintet, Op. 115
Brahms - Piano Quintet, Op. 34

20 May 1945
Recital at the Brooklyn Museum

27 May 1945 (Boston)
Recital at the Gardner Museum

4 October 1945 (Montreal)
Recital at the YM-YWHA of Montreal, accompanied by John Newmark.
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102
Bréval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5
Bach - Suite No. 2, BWV 1008
Bruch - Kol Nidrei, Op. 47

28 October 1945 (Montclair, New Jersey)  
Played Dvořak's Cello Concerto with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra at the Mount Hebron Junior High School, conducted by Frieder Weissmann.

11 November 1945 (Baltimore)
Played the Boccherini/Grützmacher Cello Concerto with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Reginald Stewart.

14 December 1945 (Baltimore)
Recital at the Peabody Conservatory, accompanied by Arpan Sandor.
Cassadó - Toccata in the Style of Frescobaldi 
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102 
Bach - Suite No. 2, BWV 1008
Stravinsky - Serenata and Aria from Suite Italienne
Duke - Dialogue (world premiere)
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1
Senaille/Salmon - Allegro spiritoso from Violin Sonata, Op. 10, No. 4

17 December 1945 (Scranton, Pennsylvania)
Played Dvořak's Cello Concerto with Scranton Philharmonic Orchestra (subbed for Joseph Schuster) at the Masonic Temple, conducted by Frieder Weissmann.

11 January 1946 (Philadelphia)
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium with pianist Bruno Eisner, violinists Jano Szanto and Albert Brusilow, and violist Trude Gundert.
Schubert - Piano Trio No. 1, Op. 99
Schubert - Duo in A major
Schubert - String Quartet "Death and the Maiden"

17 January 1946 (Philadelphia) 
Recital at the Barclay Ballroom, presented by the Philadelphia Musical Academy.
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99
Bach - Suite No. 2, BWV 1008
Cassadó - Toccata in the Style of Frescobaldi  
Bréval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5
Duke - Dialogue (world premiere) 
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Benjamin - Jamaican Rumba
Alexander Krein - Jewish Melodie, Op. 43

26 January 1946 (New York)
Recital at the Town Hall.

3 March 1946 (Torquay) 
Played Dvořak's Cello Concerto with the Torquay Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Ernest Goss.

10 March 1946 (London)
Played the Boccherini/Grützmacher Concerto with the London Symphony Orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall, conducted by Sir Malcolm Sargent.

12 April 1946 (Philadelphia) 
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium with pianist Bruno Eisner, violinists Jano Szanto and Albert Brusilow, and violist Trude Gundert. 
Schubert - String Quartet in E-flat major
Schubert - String Quartet in G major
Schubert - Fantasie in A for violin and piano 

3 May 1946 (Philadelphia)  
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium with pianist Bruno Eisner, violinists Jano Szanto and Albert Brusilow, violist Trude Gundert, cellist JaneSaunders, and bassist Roger Scott.
Schubert - Piano Quintet "Trout"
Schubert - String Quintet

24 October 1946 (Montreal) 
Recital at the YMHA of Montreal accompanied by John Newmark
Bach - Gamba Sonata No. 3, BWV 1029
Valentini/Piatti - Sonata in E major (Allettamento Op. 8, No. 10)
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99
Bloch - Prayer from Jewish Life
Ibert/Marechal - Le petit âne blanc from Histoires
Turina - Le Jeudi Saint a minuit from Sevilla, Op. 2, No. 2
Benjamin - Jamaican Rumba

27 October 1946 (New York)
Joint recital with soprano Ann Roselle at the Brooklyn Museum.

30 October 1946 (Newark, New Jersey) 
Recital at Fuld Hall with Bruno Eisner at the piano.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Debussy - Cello Sonata
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99

14-15 November 1946 (Lincoln, Nebraska)
Recital at the Doane College, accompanied by Allan Sly.
Cassadó - Toccata in the Style of Frescobaldi
Valentini/Piatti - Sonata in E major (Allettamento Op. 8, No. 10)
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102 
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009 
Eisenberg - Pizzicato Blues
Other unspecified works

18 November 1946 (Nashville)
Recital at the Ward Balmont College
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Eisenberg - Pizzicato Blues
Other unspecified works

7 November 1946 (Stillwater, Oklahoma)  
Recital at the Oklahoma A and M College, accompanied by Allan Sly.

5 February 1947
Premiered Bax's Cello Concerto with the BBC Symphony Orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall, conducted by Sit Adrian Boult.

1 March 1947 (London)
Recital for the radio, accompanied by Harriet Cohen.

24 March 1947 (Ottawa)
Recital at the Technical School Hall, accompanied by John Newmark.
Cassadó - Toccata in the Style of Frescobaldi 
Valentini/Piatti - Sonata in E major (Allettamento Op. 8, No. 10)
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102  
Debussy - Cello Sonata
Ibert/Marechal - Le petit âne blanc from Histoires
Turina - Le Jeudi Saint a minuit from Sevilla, Op. 2, No. 2
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Davydov - At the Fountain, Op. 20, No. 2

30 March 1947 (New York)
Joint recital with Vladimir Padwa at the Brooklyn Museum. Eisenberg was accompanied by Otto Herz.
Cassadó - Toccata in the Style of Frescobaldi 
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102 (3 pieces performed)
Bach/Siloti - Komm, susser Tod
Turina - Le Jeudi Saint a minuit from Sevilla, Op. 2, No. 2
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1

26 May 1947 (Bloomfield, New Jersey)
Recital at the Bloomfield High School, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn.

1 February 1948 (Millburn, New Jersey)
Recital at the Milburn High School

19 February 1948 (Philadelphia)  
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium, accompanied by Arpad Sandor.
Elgar - Cello Concerto, Op. 85
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Fauré/Casals - Après un rêve, Op. 7, No. 1
Turina - Le Jeudi Saint a minuit from Sevilla, Op. 2, No. 2
Haydn/Piatti - Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6)
Ibert/Marechal - Le petit âne blanc from Histoires
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1
Prokofiev - Gavotte from the Classical Symphony, Op. 25
Unspecified piece by Handel

2 May 1948 (Boston)
Recital at the Gardner Museum

24 October 1948 (Hackettstown, New Jersey)
Recital at the Centenary Junior College, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn. The recital included Brahms and pieces by modern and classical composers.

19 January 1949 (Orange, New Jersey)
Recital at the Orange High School
Turina - Le Jeudi Saint a minuit from Sevilla, Op. 2, No. 2
Sarasate - Zapateado, Op. 23, No. 2
Other unspecified pieces.

6 November 1949 (Montreal)
Played Haydn's Cello Concerto in D major with the CBC The Little Symphonies Orchestra, conducted by Roland Leduc.

9 November 1949 (Montreal)
Guest artist at McGill University
Boccherini - String Quintet in C major
Schubert - String Quintet in C major

15 November 1949 (Montclair, New Jersey)
Played Schumann's Cello Concerto with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Samuel Antek.

5 February 1950 (Washington DC)
Recital at the Phillips Gallery.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Haydn/Piatti - Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6)
Bach - Suite No. 6, BWV 1012 (Prelude, Sarabande, and Gavottes)
Stravinsky - Serenata and Aria from Suite Italienne
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Prokofiev - Gavotte from the Classical Symphony, Op. 25
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1

24 October 1950 (Montreal) 
Plays a Suite on an all-Bach concert at McGill University.

26 October 1950 (Montreal)
Recital at the YH-YWMA concert series at the Snowdon Auditorium, accompanied by John Newmark.
Bach - Suite No. 6, BWV 1012
Debussy - Cello Sonata
Beethoven - 7 Variations on a theme from Mozart's Magic Flute
Bloch - Prayer from Jewish Life
Haydn/Piatti - Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6)
Granados/Cassadó - Intermezzo from Goyescas
Sarasate - Zapateado, Op. 23, No. 2
Prokofiev - Gavotte from the Classical Symphony, Op. 25

12 November 1950 (Philadelphia)
All-Bach recital at the Philadelphia Musical Academy with Agi Jambor.

14 November 1950 (New York)
Recital at the Town Hall.

24 November 1950 (Montreal)
Plays on a recital at McGill University with violinist Alexander Brott and violist Lucien Robert.
Dohnanyi - Serenade, Op. 8
Bach - Suite No. 2, BWV 1008
Brahms - String Quartet No. 2, Op. 51

3 February 1950 (Washington DC) 
Recital at the Phillips Gallery with Vladimir Padwa at the piano.
Bach/Kodaly - 3 Chorale Preludes
Bach/Busoni - Toccata in C major (piano alone)
Bach - Suite No. 2, BWV 1008
Bach - Gamba Sonata No. 2, BWV 1027

5 December 1950 (New York) 
Recital at the Town Hall.

5 January 1951 (Philadelphia) 
All-Bach recital at the Philadelphia Musical Academy with Agi Jambor.

9 January 1951 (New York) 
Recital at the Town Hall.

6 March 1951 (Athens, Ohio)
Recital at the Ohio University, accompanied by Adolph Weiser.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Debussy - Cello Sonata
Stravinsky - Serenata and Aria from Suite Italienne
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Sarasate - Zapateado, Op. 23, No. 2

8 March 1951 (Zanesville, Ohio)
Recital at the Muskingum College

15 March 1951 (Newark, New Jersey)
Played Dvořak's Cello Concerto with the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Mosque Theatre, conducted by Eugene Ormandy.

27 November 1951 (Lawrence, Kansas)
Recital at the University of Kansas, accompanied by Marian Jersild.

21 January 1952 (Montreal) 
All-Bach recital with pianist John Newmark and flutist Mario Duschenes at the Gesu Theatre. The recital included an unspecified cello suite, gamba sonata, and flute sonata.

March 1952 (Belfast)
Recital in Belfast, Ireland.

24 and 27 March, and 1 April 1952 (London)
Played the complete Bach Suites and Gamba Sonatas over the course of three concerts at Wigmore Hall, accompanied by Ivor Keys on the Sonatas.

24 April 1952 (Newark, New Jersey)
Joint recital with Mieczyslaw Horszowski at the Griffith Auditorium.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Valentini/Piatti - Sonata in E major (Allettamento Op. 8, No. 10)
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99

24 May 1952 (Newark, New Jersey) 
Played the Boccherini/Grützmacher Concerto with a string ensemble at the Griffith Auditorium in honor of Mrs. Parker O. Griffith.

30 November 1952 (Cambridge, Massachusetts)
All-Bach recital at Harvard University
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Bach - Suite No. 4, BWV 1010
Bach - Suite No. 5, BWV 1011

10 December 1952 (New York)
All-Bach recital at the YM-YWHA

25 January 1953 (Washington DC) 
Recital at the Phillips Gallery.
Bach - Suite No. 3, 1009
Stravinsky - Serenata and Aria from Suite Italienne

1 February 1953 (Boston)
Played a recital called "Bach the Court Musician" at the Museum of Fine Arts, accompanied by David Bacon.

October 1954 (Birmingham, England)
Recital at the Barber Institute (Birmingham University) with Ivor Keys. Included music by Bach, Beethoven, and Fauré.

11 October 1954 (London)
Recital at Wigmore Hall with Ivor Keys.

12 December 1954 (Cambridge, Massachusetts)
Recital at the Longy School, accompanied by David Bacon.
Bréval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5
Fauré - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 117
Stravinsky - Excerpts from Suite Italienne
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1
Bach - Unspecified Suite

12 April 1955 (Boston)
Played Elgar's Cello Concerto with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Charles Munch.

10 May 1955 (Athens, Ohio)
Recital at the Ohio University with Erno Dohnanyi.
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 1, Op. 38
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 4, Op. 102, No. 1
Dohnanyi - Cello Sonata, Op. 8

16 October 1955 (London)
Recital at Wigmore Hall with Ivor Keys.

7-8 November 1955 (Montclair, New Jersey)
Played Brahms's Double Concerto with Maurice Wilk and the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Samuel Antek.

11 December 1955 (San Antonio, Texas)
Played Bloch's Schelomo with the San Antonio Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Victor Alessandro.

1 March 1956 (Bournemouth, England)
Played Elgar's Cello Concerto with the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Charles Groves.

19 October 1956 (London)
Recital at St.Mark's Church Hamilton Terrace (St. John's Wood) with Ivor Keys.

6 November 1956
Recital at the Oklahoma College for Women
Granados/Cassadó - Intermezzo from Goyescas
de Laserna/Cassadó - Tonadilla
Prokofiev - Gavotte from the Classical Symphony
Bach - Unspecified suite
Unspecified works by Schumann and Boccherini

7 April 1957 (London)
Recital at Wigmore Hall with Ivor Keys. Complete Beethoven works for cello and piano.

19 March 1958 (Stillwater, Oklahoma)
Recital at the Oklahoma State University, accompanied by Marie Friedlander.
Lully/Bazelaire - Passacaille
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Boulanger - Piece No. 3 in C-sharp minor
Fauré - Après un rêve, Op. 7, No. 1
Schumann - Adagio and Allegro, Op. 70
Prokofiev - Gavotte from the Classical Symphony, Op. 25
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165

22 October 1958 (London) 
Recital at Wigmore Hall with Ivor Keys.

May 1959 (Montclair, New Jersey)
Played Bach/Siloti Air with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Jennings Butterfield. Eisenberg also played the Sarabande from Bach's Suite No. 5.

11 May 1959 (Cambridge, Massachusetts)
Concert at the Longy School.
Gregory Tucker - Divertimento for Piano and Strings (world premiere)
Boccherini/Grützmacher - Cello Concerto in B-flat major
Villa-Lobos - Bachianas Brasileiras No. 1 (Eisenberg conducted)

6 October 1959 (London)
Solo with the Capriol Orchestra, conducted by Roy Budden.

12 March 1962 (London)  
Recital at Wigmore Hall with Ivor Keys.

3 May 1962 (Boston)
Recital at the Lowell House

7 May 1962 (Cambridge, Massachusetts)
Concert at the Longy School.
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99 (with pianist David Bacon)
Mozart - Oboe Quartet, K. 370
Schumann - Andante and Variations, Op. 46
Piston - Piano Quintet

13 November 1962 (Austin, Texas)
Recital at the University of Texas at Austin, accompanied by Dolores Jerde Keahey.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 5, Op. 102, No. 2
Martinu - Cello Sonata No. 2
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Haydn/Piatti - Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6)

13 January 1963 (Cambridge, Massachusetts)
Recital at the Longy School, accompanied by Ivor Keys.
Martinu - Cello Sonata No. 2
Bréval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99
Unspecified Bach suite

15 January 1963 (New York)
Recital at the Town Hall.

11 January 1964 (Montclair, New Jersey)
Played Elgar's Cello Concerto with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Kenneth Schermerhorn.

11 March 1964 (London)   
Recital at Wigmore Hall with Ivor Keys.

24 October 1965 (Montclair, New Jersey) 
Played Fauré's Elegie with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Kenneth Schermerhorn.

Critical Notes Series: Henle Curriculum 

Every other school year I teach a 400-level class called "String Literature Survey" at Bob Jones University in Greenville, SC. This class is designed for string majors to learn about sonatas from 1700 to 2000, starting with Corelli's violin sonatas and ending with my Sonatensatz. We cover a large range of topics including style, technique, form, the collaboration between composer and artist, etc. My main goal is for the students to be well-versed in the sonata genre. The choice of teaching exclusively sonatas was personal. We also talk about concertos and concert pieces, but not in-depth. Covering all genres would be surfacy and overwhelming.

Building a curriculum for this class was not easy. The literature about strings strongly favors violin; however, I have students who also play viola and cello. After exploring different options, I settled on the core curriculum to include Melvin Berger's Guide to Sonatas, Abram Loft's Violin and Keyboard, and a set of Henle prefaces. Together, these texts create a balanced view of the pieces that we study.

Berger's text is a good overview of the sonatas in general. Some of the information is outdated, but I believe this text serves as a good primer. As I teach the students to think critically, we learn to point out outdated or erroneous information. Berger also does not Saint-Saens and some other composers we talk about.

Loft's 2-volume set takes a deep look at works for violin. I also like Loft's writing style, something that works well as a starting point for my students as they learn to write about music. However, Loft is antagonistic and unhelpful with works by Saint-Saens, D'indy, and others; this is very disappointing since his overview of most standard violin works is superb. Loft does not mention Poulenc's violin sonata.

Henle prefaces vary in writing style and information from editor to editor, but they all contain information useful for research, which prepares my students for master's and doctoral programs. Henle's text also needs to be balanced out because, for example, Brahms's Cello Sonata, Op. 38 does not mention a connection to Bach's The Art of the Fugue when there is a clear connection. This is where Berger's text is helpful. Nevertheless, the Henle text is generally well-researched. Another perk of using Henle prefaces is that students make a connection between the scholarship and the edition, which builds discernment.

When we come to 20th-century sonatas, we use texts from biographies. For example, we read Barbara Heyman's Barber biography about the cello sonata. Both the cello sonata and cello concerto are covered in great depth. For Poulenc, we read Wilfrid Mellers's Poulenc biography, which covers his sonatas. For Shostakovich, we read Elizabeth Wilson's Shostakovich biography. For some composers like John Corigliano and William Bolcom, we read the personal writings of those composers.

We finish the class with a look at my Sonatensatz that I wrote in 2003 and revised several times for various performances.

Students choose a sonata that we didn't cover in class for their term papers. The choices in this regard are limitless. Typically, students end up choosing a sonata for their senior recital as a result of taking this class.

David Popper's Concert Schedule 1860-68 

My sources are Stephen De'ak's David Popper and Clytus Gottwald's Max Seifriz: Beiträge zu Lebenslauf und Werk. Other sources are linked. Additional information is provided in brackets.

 

29 March 1860 (Royal Estates Theatre in Prague, Prague Conservatory Orchestra under Kittl)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 6 "Pastorale," Op. 68
Ambros: Overture to drama Der Wunderthätige Magus
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 5 "Emperor," Op. 73 (Bülow)
Servais: Souvenir de St Petersburg, Op. 15 (Popper)
Hérold: aria "Jours de mon enfance" from act 1 of opera Le pré aux clercs (Klettnerová, Řebíček on obbligato violin)
Léonard: Fantaisie pastorale "Les échos," Op.22 (Hřímalý)
Chopin: Nocturne in D-flat major, Op.27/2 (Bülow)
Wagner/Liszt: March from Tannhäuser (Bülow)
Liszt: Rigoletto, paraphrase de concert (Bülow)

 

18 December 1861 (Vienna)

Beethoven: Piano Trio, Op. 70, No. 2
Goltermann: Cello Concerto No. 1 in A minor, Op. 14

 

7 March 1862 (Prague Girls Reformatory Institute)

Beethoven: Archduke Trio, Op. 97

 

9 March 1862 (Prague, Konvikt)

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 2, Op. 58 (Popper, Čermáková pf)
Goltermann: Concerto [No. 1] (Popper, Slanský ? pf)
Chopin: Scherzo No. 2, Op. 31 (Čermáková pf)
Servais: Fantaisie on Slavonic/Bohemian Folk Songs (Popper, Slanský ? pf)
Schubert: Der Neugierige (Bachmann)
Schubert: Auf dem Wasser zu Singen (Ehrenbergů)
Schumann: Waldesgespräch (Ehrenbergů)
Schubert: selection from Die schöne Müllerin (Bachmann)

 

12 March 1862 (Prague, Žofín Island, with Estates Theatre orchestra)

Slavík: unspecified Overture (‘first performance’) 
Procházka: chorus Naše vlast (solo v, Hardtmuth, Hlahol male voice singing society)
Popper: Adagio and Rondo [from Cello Concerto No. 2, Op. 24] (Popper)
Jelen: Tam v dáli!: (Josefa Schmidt-Procházková)
Lachner: chorus Na Vltavě (solo T, solo v, TTBB chorus; Hlahol male voice singing society, dir. J.L. Lukes) 
Veit: Concert Overture, Op. 17, Nocí k světlu
Škroup: unsp. aria from opera Oldřich a Božena (Oldřich and Božena) (Ehrenbergů)
Chopin: 2nd and 3rd movs. from unsp. Concerto (Svobodová)
2 Czech Folk Songs: ([J.L.] Lukes)
Vojáček: chorus Před nepřítelem (Before the foe) (TTBB chorus; Hlahol singing society)

 

8 May 1862 (Prague, New Town Theatre [Novoměstské divadlo], with Estates Theatre orchestra under Jahn)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 7, Op. 92
Winter: Aria from opera Das unterbrochene Opferfest (Eilers)
Donizetti: aria of Antonina from act 1 of opera Belisario (Bělská)
Pivoda: Slovanská píseň (Bělská, Pivoda)
Popper: Concertstück [probably a movement of Concerto No. 2] (Popper)
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 3, Op. 37, mvt. I (Pišová)

 

9 (or 2) May 1862 (Leipzig Conservatory)

Schumann: Cello Concerto, Op. 129 (Popper)
Goltermann: Cello Concerto [No. 1] (Popper)
 

9 November 1862 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Overture Coriolan 
Chopin: Nocturne in B major and Polonaise in A-flat major (Bransart) 
David Popper: Cello Concerto in E minor [Op. 24] (Popper) 
Liszt: Tasso 
Schubert: Symphony in C major "Great"

 

27 November 1862 (Löwenberg)

Wagner: Vorspiel from Tristan und Isolde 
Rossini: Aria from I Tancredi (Albertine Meyer) 
Beethoven: Cello Sonata in A major, Op. 69 (Popper, Bronsart) 
Bellini: Aria from Montechi e Capuleti (Meyer) 
Berlioz: Overture to Benvenuto Cellini 
Liszt: Orpheus 
Schubert: Der Wanderer (Meyer) 
Beethoven: Symphony No. 5, Op. 67

 

26 December 1862 (Löwenberg)

Wagner: Eine Faust-Ouverture 
Beethoven: Horn Sonata in F major, Op. 17 (Bronsart. Klotz) 
[Seifriz]/Popper: Fantasie über Lieder des Fürsten [Op. 1] (Popper) 
Chopin: Nocturne in F# major (Bronsart) 
Liszt: Valse impromptu (Bronsart) 
Liszt: Les Preludes 
Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 3 "Scottish," Op. 56

 

28 January 1863 (Löwenberg)

Cherubini: Overture to Der Wasserträger 
Beethoven: Piano Trio, "Archduke," Op. 97 (Bronsart. Seifriz. Popper) 
Schumann: Beim Abschied zu singen op. 84 
Beethoven: Meerestille und glückliche Fahrt op. 112 
Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 4 "Italian," Op. 90
Beethoven: Overture to Egmont

 

29 January 1863 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 6 "Pastorale," Op. 68
Beethoven: Aria from Fidelio (Louise Köster, Berlin) 
Mendelssohn: Overture to Athalia 
Weber: Szene and Arie from Oberon (Köster) 
[Seifriz]/Popper: Fantasie über Lieder des Fürsten [Op. 1] (Popper) 
Taubert: Zwei Lieder (welche?) (Köster) 
Weber: Overture from Freischütz

 

26 February 1863 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Leonoren-Ouverture No. 1 
Beethoven: Sonata appassionata Op. 57 (Bronsart) 
Servais: Fantaisie characteristique (Popper) 
Glinka: Kamarinskaya 
Berlioz: Overture to Le Corsaire 
Schumann: Symphony No. 4, Op. 120

 

26 March 1863 (Löwenberg)

Brahms: Serenade 
Spontini: Overture to Ferdinand Cortez 
Beethoven: Sonata Op. 31, No. 2 (Bronsart) 
Batta: Elegie (Popper) 
Schubert: Ave Maria (Popper) 
Glinka: Capriccio brillant sur jota Aragonesa 
Rossini: Overture to Guillaume Tell

 

7 April 1863 (Löwenberg)

Taubert: Overture to Der Sturm 
Mozart: Arie from Figaros Hochzeit (Mampe-Babnigg) 
Popper: Konzertstück for Violin und Violoncello (Stern. Popper) 
Spontini: Szene und Arie aus Vestalin (Mampe-Babnigg) 
Chopin: Nocturne in D minor (Bronsart) 
Liszt: Hungarian Rhapsody No. 6 (Bronsart) 
Moritz Strakosch: Patti-Walzer (Mampe-Babnigg) 
Berlioz: Overture to Les Francs-juges 
Beethoven: Symphony No. 4, Op. 60

 

17 June 1863 (Prague, Žofín Island)

Popper played an unspecified solo work with Orchestra

 

12 November 1863 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 1, Op. 21 
Spohr: Overture to Jessonda 
Popper: Fantasie über Themen aus den Hugenotten (Popper) 
Schumann: Nachtlied for Choir and Orchestra
Schumann: Zigeunerleben (orch. Seifriz)
Wagner: Overture to Rienzi

 

18 December 1863 (Löwenberg)

Méhul: Overture to La chasse du jeune Henri 
Servais: Souvenir de Petersbourg, Op. 15 (Popper) 
Spontini: Overture to Olympia 
Berlioz: Romeo et juliette, Parts 2 and 3
Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique, mvt. II 
Rossini: Overture to Guillaume Tell

 

24 January 1864 (in Berlin) (Löwenberg)

Volkmann: Cello Concerto, Op. 33 (Popper. Bülow)
Servais: Morceau de concert (Popper. Bülow)

 

4 March 1864 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 7, Op. 92
Schumann: Overture to Manfred, Op. 115 
Volkmann: Cello Concerto [Op. 33] (Popper) 
Schubert/Liszt: Reitermarsch 
Spontini: Overture to Ferdinand Cortez

 

14 April 1864 (Löwenberg)

Liszt: Tasso 
Donizetti: Aria from Lucia di Lammermoor (Weiss) 
Fürst Constantin: Ich bleib bei dir. Lied for Tenor and Horn (Weiss. Klotz) 
[Volkmann: Cello Concerto, Op. 33 (Popper)] (listed as a different work in the quotation)
Fürst Constantin: Sehnsucht (Weiss. Klotz) 
Fürst Constantin: Wo poch ich an (Weiss. Popper) 
Weber: Overture to  Oberon 
Beethoven: Symphony No. 7, Op. 92

 

June 1864 (in Breslau)

Popper: Romanesca [unpublished]
Schumann: Phantasiestucke [Op. 73]
Schumann: Trio in D minor, Op. 63 (with Silberschmidt and Damrosch)

 

24 August 1864 (Karlsruhe in honor of Volkmann's 49th birthday)

Volkmann: Piano Trio, Op. 5 (Rötscher, Reményi, Popper)
Volkmann: Cello Concerto, Op. 33 (Popper, Seifriz replaced Bülow due to illness) 

 

13 October 1864 (Leipzig)

Mozart/Popper: Larghetto for Clarinet Quintet, K. 581 (Popper)
Pergolesi: Air [Nina] (Popper) 
Volkmann: Cello Concerto, Op. 33 (Popper) 

 

27 November 1864 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 4, Op. 60
Mendelssohn: Overture "Die Hebriden"
Rubinstein: Cello Concerto, Op. 65 (Popper)
Liszt: Mephisto-Walzer for Orchestra
Rossini: Overture to Guillaume Tell

 

4 December 1864 (Prague)

Bach: Sarabande [G major Suite] (Popper) 
Rubinstein: Sonata No. 1 in D major, Op. 18 (Popper)
Pergolesi: Air [Nina] (Popper) 
Servais: Morceau de concert (Popper)
Popper: [Scenes d'un bal masque, Op. 3]

 

December 1864 (Magdeburg)

Volkmann: Cello Concerto, Op. 33 (Popper)

 

December 1864 (Prague, Cacilienverein)

No program was given. Probably a mix of the above works.

 

26 December 1864 (Löwenberg)

Gade: Overture Nachklänge an Ossian 
Mozart: Aria from Titus (Lorch) 
Bach: Sarabande [G major Suite] (Popper) 
Popper: Scenes d'un bal masque [Op. 3] (Popper) 
Beethoven: Zwei schottische Lieder (Lorch. Popper. ?) 
Beethoven: Overture to König Stephan op. 117 
Schubert: Symphony No. 7

 

5 February 1865 (Löwenberg)

Raff: Suite in C major, Op. 101 
Volkmann: Cello Concerto, Op. 33 (Popper) 
Bülow: Des Sängers Fluch 
Berlioz: Romeo et Juliette, Part 3 and 2

 

19 March 1865 (Löwenberg)

Liszt: Tasso   
Volkmann: Cello Concerto, Op. 33 (Popper) 
Schumann: Overture to Manfred, Op. 115
Fürst Constantin: Wo poch ich an (Lorch) 
Berlioz: Overture to Le roi Lear 
Beethoven: Symphony No. 5, Op. 67

 

6 April 1865 (Löwenberg)

Maurer: Symphony in F minor [No. 1, Op. 67]
Schumann: Overture to Braut von Messina 
Bach/Gounod: Meditation (Ave Maria) (Popper) 
Pergolesi: Air [Nina] (Popper) 
Kletzer: Rhapsodie hongroise [Op. 7] (Popper) 
Berlioz: Rackozy-Marsch from La damnation de Faust 
Glinka: Kamarinskaya 
Gade: Overture to Michel Angelo

 

23 April 1865 (Löwenberg)

Schumann: Symphony No. 1, Op. 38
Mozart: Overture to Zauberflöte 
Reichelt: Das Meer erglänzet weit hinaus (Lorch) 
[Seifriz]/Popper: Fantasie über Lieder des Fürsten [Op. 1] (Popper) 
Schubert: Zwei Lieder (Der Neugierige. Ungeduld) (Lorch) 
Spontini: Overture to Ferdinand Cortez

 

19 November 1865 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 1, Op. 21
Rubinstein: Faust 
Molique: Cello Concerto, Op. 45 (Popper) 
Gade: Overture to Im Hochland 
Wagner: Tristan und Isolde (Vorspiel and Liebestod)

 

17 December 1865 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Overture and 2 Lieder aus der Musik zu Egmont (Lorch) 
Popper: Cello Concerto No. 1 in D minor, Op. 8 (Popper) - world premiere
Weber: Overture to  Euryanthe 
Schubert: Symphony No. 7

 

4 February 1866 (Löwenberg) 

Gade: Overture to Hamlet  
Berlioz: La Captive (Lorch) 
Volkmann: Cello Concerto, Op. 33 (Popper) 
Cherubini: Overture to Der Wasserträger 
Schumann: Symphony No. 3, "Rhenish," Op. 97

 

18 February 1866 (Löwenberg)

Mendelssohn: Meeresstille und glückliche Fahrt 
Vieuxtemps: Violin Concerto No. 1, Op. 10 (Introduction and Rondo) (Frau Schmidt-Bydo) 
Liszt: Mignon (Lorch) 
Schumann: Frühlingsnacht (Lorch) 
Popper: Ich will meine Seele tauchen [Op. 2 No. 5] (Lorch) 
Ernst: Fantasie über Motive aus Othello, Op. 11 (Schmidt-Bydo) 
Berlioz: Carneval romain, Op. 9
Beethoven: Symphony No. 6, "Pastorale," Op. 68

 

18 March 1866 (Löwenberg)

Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 4, "Italian," Op. 90
Chopin: Piano Concerto No. 1 in E minor, Op. 11 (Topp) 
Weber: Overture to Der Beherrscher der Geister 
Liszt: La Campanella (Topp) 
Popper: Cello Concerto [No. 1 in D minor, Op. 8] (Popper) 
Liszt: Grande Polonaise in E major (Topp) 
Beethoven: Overture to Fidelio

 

September 1866 (Stuttgart, Hofkonzert)

Suite for 2 Cellos, Op. 16

 

25 November 1866 (Löwenberg)

Schumann: Symphony No. 3, "Rhenish," Op. 97
Berlioz: Overture to Waverley 
[Seifriz]/Popper: Fantasie über Lieder des Fürsten [Op. 1] (Popper) 
Schubert/Liszt: Zwei Lieder mit Orch. (Der Doppelgänger. Die junge Nonne) (Lorch) 
Liszt: Piano Concerto No. 1 (Topp) 
Spontini: Overture to Ferdinand Cortez

 

26 December 1866 (Löwenberg)

Mozart: Symphony in C major
Beethoven: Overture to Fidelio 
Boccherini/[Grützmacher]: Cello Concerto (Popper) 
Popper: Romanze [Op. 5] (Popper. Topp) 
Berlioz: Romeo et Juliette, Scherzo Die Fee Mab 
Mendelssohn: Nocturne from Sommernachtstraum
Weber: Overture to Euryanthe

 

31 December 1866 (Prague)

Mendelssohn: Piano Trio No. 2 in C minor, Op. 66

 

22 January 1867 (Zürich)

Pergolesi: Nina (Popper, Kirchner)
Popper: Romanze, Op. 5 (Popper, Kirchner)
Schumann: Abendlied from 6 Songs, Op. 107 (Popper, Kirchner)
Schumann: Piano Trio No. 2 in F major, Op. 80 (Hegar, Popper, Kirchner)

 

10 February 1867 (Löwenberg)

Volkmann: Symphony in D minor [No. 1, Op. 44]
Weber: Overture to Der Beherrscher der Geister 
Molique: Andante from Cello Concerto, Op. 45 (Popper) 
Popper: Maskenballscenen [Op. 3] (Popper) 
Schubert/Liszt: Reitermarsch 
Berlioz: La Captive (Lorch) 
Liszt: Mazeppa

 

31 March 1867 (Löwenberg)

Gade: Symphony No. 4, Op. 20
Mendelssohn: Overture "Meeresstille und glückliche Fahrt"
Popper: Sarabande und Gavotte [Op. 10] (Popper) 
Bach/Gounod/Popper: Meditation (Popper) 
Berlioz: Rackozy-Marsch 
Beethoven: Adagio from Symphony No. 9, Op. 125
Weber: Overture to Oberon

 

10 September 1867 (Vienna, Carltheater, organized by Ullmann)

Mendelssohn: Piano Trio No. 1 in D minor (mvts. 1 and 2), Op. 49 (Auer, Popper, Willmer)
Opera arias (Carlotta Patti)
Popper: Andante [Sarabande] and Gavotte, Op. 10 (Popper, Willmer)
Molique: [Andante] from Cello Concerto, Op. 45 (Popper, Willmer)
Popper: Warum and Papillon, Op. 3 (Popper, Willmer)
Schubert/Popper: Du bist die Ruch (Popper, Willmer)
Gounod: Serenade " Le Vallon" (Lefort, Popper)
Vieuxtemps: Ballade and Polonaise, Op. 38 (Auer, Willmer)
Spohr: Andante [from a concerto] (Auer, Willmer)
Paganini: Caprice [No. not given] (Auer)
Piano solos (Willmer)

 

15 December 1867 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 4, Op. 60
Marschner: Overture to Adolph von Nassau 
Schumann: Cello Concerto , Op. 129 (Popper) 
Seifriz: Fest-Gesang for Choir and Solos 
Schumann: Fest-Ouverture Op. 123

 

1 January 1868 (Löwenberg)

Mendelssohn: Hochzeitsmarsch from Sommernachtstraum 
Popper: Cello Concerto in D minor (Adagio) [Op. 8] (Popper) 
Servais: Morceau de Concert [Op. 14] (Popper) 
Spontini: Overture to Olympia 
Weber: Overture to Oberon 
Wagner: Tannhäuser Einzug der Gäste 
Rossini: Overture to Guillaume Tell

 

9 February 1868 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 8, Op. 93
Gade: Overture to Nachklänge an Ossian 
Molique: Andante from Cello Concerto, Op. 45 (Popper) 
Popper: Maskenball-Scenen [Op. 3] (Popper) 
Haydn: Variationen über Gott erhalte Franz 
Liszt: Les Preludes

 

15 March 1868 (Löwenberg)

Bülow: Des Sängers Fluch 
Händel: Theme and Variations in E major [The Harmonious Blacksmith] (Menter) 
Tausig: Soirees de Vienne No. 3 (Menter) 
Batta: Souvenir de Don Sébastien: Elégie, Op. 48 (Popper) 
Popper: Mazurka [Op. 11] (Popper) 
Piatti: Airs baskyrs, Op. 8 (Popper) 
Wagner: Prelude to Die Meistersinger
Beethoven: Symphony No. 2, Op. 36

 

13 April 1868 (Löwenberg)

Berlioz: Overture to Le roi Lear 
Liszt: Don Juan-Fantasie (Menter) 
Mendelssohn: Overture to Die schöne Melusine 
Mozart/Popper: Adagio [from String Quintet, K. 516] (Popper) 
Popper: Gavotte [Op. 10] (Popper) 
F. Kletzer: Ungarische Rhapsodie, Op. 7 (Popper) 
Chopin: Grande Polonaise precedee d'un Andante spianato, Op. 22 (Menter) 
Beethoven: Symphony No. 5, Op. 67

 

15 November 1868 (Vienna, Music Society)

Haydn: String Quartet in G major (Hellmesberger, Brodsky, Bachrich, Popper)
Beethoven: Piano Trio, Op. 70, No. 1 (Hellmesberger, Popper, Schenner)
Beethoven: String Quintet in C major Hellmesberger, Brodsky, Bachrich, Nigg, Popper)

 

3 December 1868 (Vienna, Philarmonic)

Esser: Symphony in B minor, Op. 79
Volkmann: Cello Concerto, Op. 33 (Popper. Esser)

 

14 March 1869 (Löwenberg)

Schumann: Symphony No. 2, Op. 61
Beethoven: Overture to Fidelio 
Popper: Romanze for Violoncello and Piano [Op. 5] (Peer) 
Berlioz: Romeo et Juliette, Part 1

Critical Notes Series: Tchaikovsky's Variations on a Rococo Theme 

We are celebrating our new release of Tchaikovsky's Variations on a Rococo Theme Urtext Edition.

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840–93) remains, arguably, the most famous Russian composer from the 
Romantic Era. His Variations on a Rococo Theme reflect his lifelong passion for Mozart’s music. The Variations bear a striking resemblance to Franz Danzi’s variations on Mozart’s “La ci darem la mano” from the opera Don Giovanni. Danzi included his variations as the finale to his Cello Concerto No. 1, in A major, the same key as Tchaikovsky’s Variations. 

The history of the Variations is often made out to be more dramatic than it really was. This work started its life in a piano score in Tchaikovsky’s hand in late 1876 or early 1877. Composed for the cellist Wilhelm (Guillaume) Fitzenhagen, Tchaikovsky naturally relied on Fitzenhagen to help him make the work more idiomatic for the instrument. Fitzenhagen made the necessary corrections to the piano score, which Tchaikovsky then orchestrated. The manuscript of the orchestration in Tchaikovsky’s hand reflects all Fitzenhagen’s suggestions. The cello part in the orchestra score is almost entirely in Fitzenhagen’s hand; however, this is not out of the ordinary, as the orchestra score to Tchaikovsky’s Pezzo Capriccioso contains the cello part in the hand of Anatoly Brandukov, Pezzo’s dedicatee. 

The disagreement between Tchaikovsky and Fitzenhagen arose when Fitzenhagen submitted the work to 
Tchaikovsky’s publisher, Jurgenson. Jurgenson complained that Fitzenhagen was trying to rewrite the Variations, namely that he wanted to cut the final variation (No. 8) and to reorder the others. There is no reason to believe that the complaint extended beyond this major change. Any other changes, like slurring, and minor articulation, and dynamic adjustments in the cello part were inconsequential to the performance of the work. It is evident from the manuscript of the orchestra score that the final variation is crossed out in pencil, and pencil marks redirect the order of the variations. However, the entire score remains intact and was used for the cello part of our edition. The fair copy of the piano score, mostly in Tchaikovsky’s hand, with Fitzenhagen’s suggestions, was used as the source of the piano score in the present edition. Because the piano score of Variation No. 4 does not exist in the version parallel to the orchestra score, we used the same variation from the first edition (1878), with minor adjustments to the dynamics as well as the variation’s 
ending from the orchestra score. 

Tchaikovsky’s tempo-marking spelling errors were corrected without comment. Editorial marks are noted with brackets and dashed lines. We believe that our edition is the first to reflect Tchaikovsky’s desires without the need to rely on Victor Kubatsky’s mid-1900s reconstruction, which he sought through dubious means with the help of a criminologist. 

The Schott "Urtext" edition even claims the following: 

The music of the present edition of the original score version is based on the edition by the cellist Victor L. Kubatsky (1891–1970), one of Anatoly Brandukov's students, in volume 30b of the Old Tchaikovsky Complete Edition (Moscow, 1956). (Before V. L. Kubatsky reconstructed the original version, the Scientific Research Institute of Criminology, MVD, in the USSR had been asked to analyse the damaged, changed and pasted parts of the piano autograph score as arranged by Fitzenhagen, as well as the autograph score. The file of the expert, A. I. Purtow, is dated 3 July 1955).

We would have hoped that an Urtext edition would have used the manuscript as the source instead of a reconstruction from 80 years after the work's composition.

The sources were graciously provided by the Russian National Museum of Music in Moscow. 

A special thank you to Phillip Gaskill for offering his help in proofreading this project. 

Enjoy other titles we publish by Tchaikovsky:

Pezzo Capriccioso, Op. 62 (Urtext Edition, Cello and Piano)
October, from The Seasons, Op. 37b, No. 10 (Transcribed for Cello and Piano)
Nocturne Op. 19, No. 4 for Cello and Piano (original key: C# minor)
Cello Concerto, TH 249 (Piano Reduction and Solo Part)
Aveu Passionne (Transcribed for Cello and Piano)
Andante cantabile, from Symphony No. 5 (Transcribed for Cello and Piano)
 

Reviews of Major Publishers 

(Presented in alphabetical order)

Ars Antiqva (Complete Instrumental Works by Vivaldi edited by Olivier Fourés) 

If you are looking to play some of the more obscure works by Vivaldi, you might start with the Ricordi complete edition (which is highly edited, especially in the bass and cembalo parts). But there is a new complete edition on the market published by Ars Antiqva. 

This is what the website says about their edition: Ars Antiqua, Madrid, 2010 -. format: 23 x 33 cm (scores & parts), with critical notes included with the score. Softbound, in individual portfolios (one portfolio, consisting of one or a group of works, is considered a volume). 

A few things to note here. 23x33cm is roughly 9x13 inches. That size is fine for music printing. But that's not the actual size of the score and parts you receive, but something roughly 8.5x12.5 inches. This makes a huge difference since music is typically measured in millimeters. They are printed on pretty heavy cardstock. The printing is glossy. If any light hits the music, you are blinded by the reflection. The printing of the parts is also odd. The score has 2 works in it, which would make sense for the parts to be bundled in that format. But each piece comes with its own set of parts. This is confusing. The potential for grabbing a part to the wrong piece is much greater. 

The staff size in the score is 4.0mm. The standard for an orchestra score is 5.0-6.0mm. Those extra 1-2mm really help the readability. The score pages are tightly packed with 4 systems per page (in the edition I am reviewing). Parts are a little over 7.0mm in staff size, which is fine, but they are not balanced with regards to the number of bars per system and staves per page. 

Conclusion: The material for the critical notes seems well researched. However, as a performance edition, it's pretty much useless. I hope that this company takes my review to heart and revises the editions that have the potential to be the best Vivaldi edition out there. For now 3/10.

 

Bärenreiter 

It seems like almost by storm Bärenreiter has taken the sheet music market in the last 15 years, but this company is almost 100 years old and has been consistently publishing pretty decent editions before going heavily into the "urtext" market. As a young cellist, I remember running into Bärenreiter with their edition of Alkan's sonata and a few complete editions like Neue Bach Ausgabe and Neue Mozart Ausgabe. But in the last 15 years, they have become more aggressive in their marketing campaign. They have a good reputation to fall back on. 

Today, Bärenreiter markets itself as primarily an "urtext" publisher of public domain music, but they also publish quite a bit of contemporary works by composers like Matthias Pintscher and others. Bärenreiter seems to have a good relationship with Henle, their direct competitor in the "urtext" market, even publishing orchestra parts for Henle's complete Haydn edition. 

Every company has a slogan: "Bärenreiter Urtext: the last word in authentic text - the musicians' choice." This is where I take issue with Bärenreiter. You might say, "it's just a slogan." But I believe that a slogan should honestly reflect reality. 

Bärenreiter's scholarship is hit or miss. They have some world-class scholars working for them as editors. Saying that these editors have the "last word" on any type of scholarship makes anyone who disagrees with their research look like a fool. I've seen this and experienced it myself by disagreeing with editions like Beethoven's symphonies and sonatas, Dvorak, and Elgar's concertos. Bärenreiter's editors do not present an airtight case for any of their more "unconventional" choices. The musician should not be shamed into playing something because a famous editor says so. With much knowledge comes much responsibility. Stay humble! 

Bärenreiter recently published what they call "Cello Sonata No. 3" by Saint-Saëns. Their editor presents a very weak case for this work. I find it curious that Bärenreiter charges $25 for an incomplete work based on rejected sketches. How is this a "musician's choice?" The part is not even annotated with fingerings or bowings. A performance edition would be more of the "musician's choice." The editor doesn't even hide that he is fudging the evidence in the preface by taking Saint-Saëns's words out of context and changing some words to scotch tape his weak argument. 

My last issue with Bärenreiter is their engraving. In addition to wrong notes (which I've never seen fixed) and spelling errors, Barenreiter's engravers don't consider page turns for string players, and tend to cram too much music on the page (see Debussy's Cello Sonata, second movement as one example of many). In the case of "urtext" editions of chamber music by Dvorak and Smetana, they just take the old Supraphon editions and do a whiteout job on them like the International Music Company used to do. These editions still have many bad page-turns and unintuitive multi-bar rest groupings. Some of their Neue Bach Ausgabe vocal scores have very bad alignment issues. 

Conclusion: use caution when purchasing Bärenreiter. If the piece is also available from Henle, that would be a preferred route. If Bärenreiter is the only publisher, proceed with caution. 

 

Boosey & Hawkes, Sikorski, and Wise Music Classical (formerly Music Sales Group)

You've probably heard of the first two publishers, but what about the last one? Wise Music Classical is one of the biggest firms in the world to control classical publishing and licensing. They are the equivalent of the Universal Music Group that loves to demonetize YouTube videos. Whether you like it or not Wise Music and Hal Leonard control most of the classical music publishing in the world. In my estimation, the larger the company, the weaker the quality control. 

Boosey and Sikorski are under the Hal Leonard umbrella. Chester, Chant du monde, Schirmer, Novello, and many others are under the Wise Music umbrella. But get this, Hal Leonard is technically under the Wise Music umbrella. So even though Wise doesn't list Boosey and Sikorski in their publisher list, Hal reports to Wise. 

So basically anything on your stand that is not Breitkopf, Peters, IMC, or Barenreiter somehow has a tie to the Wise Music Group. Why did I include Wise in a review about Boosey and Sikorski? Because Wise controls Chant du monde, which is the publisher that brings Soviet music to French-speaking countries, like Boosey to English-speaking, and Sikorski to German-speaking. If you want to rent orchestral parts to Shostakovich, Kabalevsky, or Khachaturian (all published by Sikorski) in the US, you must contact the Schirmer rental office; and Schirmer is controlled by Wise. I hope you are catching all of this. To find out which office you need to get in touch with for your rental needs, you can check on zinfonia.com. In most cases, you will be talking to Boosey or an affiliate of Wise. 

In addition to Soviet music, Boosey publishes many contemporary composers from English-speaking countries, composers like Bernstein, Copland, Bartok, and others. Sikorski, in addition to Soviet music, publishes many contemporary composers from German-speaking countries: Auerbach, Schnittke, Kancheli, and others. 

Historically, both Boosey and Sikorski have relied heavily on reprinting Soviet music, which is full of mistakes and poorly engraved. Some decent old engravings of Boosey's include Mussorgsky/Ravel Pictures, Prokofiev Violin Concerto No. 2, and Bartok Concerto for Orchestra. Sikorski's Prokofiev and Shostakovich cello sonatas from the 1960s are well-engraved. Those are the plates that IMC now uses in their reprints. Please avoid the newer publications of those works from Sikorski (read my blog on yuriyleonovich.com to see why). 

In recent years, Boosey has stepped up their game by hiring a team of top-notch engravers in New York to overhaul their catalog. You will find Copland's Symphony No. 3 and Billy the Kid, and a few Prokofiev works in the standard repertoire with the new facelift. I got to perform Copland 3 from one of these new engravings. It really looks great. Prokofiev's Concertino solo/piano edition (edited by Blok) and Cello Concerto orchestra parts have also been overhauled. But then again, they are still selling things like Prokofiev's Sinfonia Concertante in the old edition for $70. Also, keep in mind that Boosey might be correcting some very obvious mistakes, but they are generally not working with editors who know their sources. So the updated editions of Prokofiev will not be fixing any pitch errors like several dozen in Sinfonia. 

A short story about Boosey and Prokofiev's Cello Concerto, Op. 58: when Prokofiev met Rostropovich in the late 1940s, many project ideas opened up. One of the ideas was to rewrite the Cello Concerto into what would become Sinfonia Concertante. Meanwhile, in western Europe, there was a copy of the unpublished Cello Concerto floating around. Boosey jumped to the opportunity to be the first to publish this work in 1951 without the composer's knowledge. In 1951, Prokofiev and Rostropovich were well on their way to revising the Concerto, and the publication of the piece in its original form was far from Prokofiev's mind. I got the chance to review the composer's autograph of the piano reduction. In fact, Boosey's premature publication contains text that is not congruent with Prokofiev's final thoughts on the work. Thus, the recordings by Starker, Walevska, Isserlis, Gerhardt, and Solow do not reflect the most accurate reading of the work, but just reading, perhaps passing towards the final version of the original Concerto, Op. 58. 

Sikorski, on the other hand, seems to be getting worse, while still charging an arm and a leg. Their engraver team is not trained to produce top-notch work, and the glossy paper they print their music on is atrocious. You can't read it or write on it. Avoid at all costs! 

Conclusion: in our day, it's difficult to avoid buying from Boosey, Sikorski, or the two giants: Hal Leonard and Wise Music. Avoid Sikorski, if there is another option. Understand that you will most likely be buying music with dozens of mistakes in it.

 

Breitkopf & Härtel 

Breitkopf is the grandfather of all contemporary publishing companies. It was established in 1719. Whether classical musicians realize it or not, they are the most familiar with this publisher over any other because Breitkopf published 99% of all the major orchestra repertoire we play. We use their original parts or the reprints, but the Breitkopf signature look is immediately recognizable. 

Breitkopf is the publisher of Beethoven, Brahms, Schumann (Clara and Robert), Schubert. You might be surprised that the first edition of Fauré's Violin Sonata No. 1 was published by Breitkopf. This is the publisher of Klengel, Fitzenhagen, Grützmacher . They also published modern music by composers such as Jean Sibelius and Günter Raphael, and others. In fact, Dvorak's Cello Concerto in A major in Raphael's arrangement was published by Breitkopf. 

Affectionately called Barenwronger, Breitkopf has had a spotty history with regards to accuracy, primarily because of Grützmacher's editions. Otherwise, their historical publications are worthy of their high esteem. 

In the last two decades, Breitkopf has entered the "urtext" market and is producing some amazing updates to their old classics with the help of leading scholars and very competent engravers. Breitkopf works with Henle on Henle's orchestra projects, providing orchestra parts. Having said this, Breitkopf still publishes many of their old standards, so if you are interested in their new editions, make sure you look at the "urtext" symbol and/or publication date. 

Conclusion: Breitkopf is a great publisher and is highly recommended. I would choose Breitkopf Urtext over Bärenreiter any day. Their new engravings are beautiful, clear, and accurate. Please avoid anything with Grützmacher's name on it.

 

Carl Fischer 

Carl Fischer is your home for musical hoaxes. Fritz Kreisler, anyone? They also have the "Telemann" Sinfonia arranged for orchestra, actually composed by Robert Bennett Brown in the style of Vivaldi. You might have played it in high school if you went down the US public school track. 

Carl Fischer has some decent performance editions of Goltermann and Saint-Saens concertos (don't buy them for the notes, though!). This publisher used to be much more popular before 1970 when they used to publish pedagogical rep like Popper's Hungarian Rhapsody and even their own cello method. 

You are probably familiar with Alwin Schroeder's 170 Foundation Studies, which was great in its original 1916 printing, but is the worst place to spend your money with the new Robert Hughey edition (avoid at all costs... spread the message far and wide... tell all of your colleagues). I posted the original edition of Volume 1 on IMSLP for your use. 

Carl Fischer also publishes 20th-century contemporary works by composers such as Howard Hanson, Ernest Bloch, and others. 

Conclusion: as a cellist, you will rarely run into Carl Fischer. The only things I see worth buying from their catalog are Kreisler pieces, Bloch's cello collection, and 15 Favorite Contest Pieces edited by Collier, maybe Saint-Saens's Concerto No. 1 for decent fingerings.

 

Faber Music

Looking for British or Australian composers from the last 100 years? You will, no doubt, run into Faber Music (with their signature fortissimo mark). This is the publisher of Britten's Suites, Malcolm Arnold, Thomas Adès, Peter Sculthorpe. Faber was the publisher of Deryck Cooke's completion of Mahler 10. Bridge's Oration? Faber. Colin and David Matthews? Faber. Steven Isserlis editions? Faber. 

Faber prides itself on having Elaine Gould, the author of "Behind Bars," as their editor. Behind Bars is an engraving manual that many typesetters swear by. This book is sort of a sequel to Gardner Read's "Music Notation." Both are very good books to fine-tune your craft of engraving. 

While I am not a huge fan of Faber's font choice, I can't deny that their engravings are done very well. 

Conclusion: I highly recommend all of Isserlis's collections. Faber's catalog is well worth exploring for Carl Davis's Ballade, Malcolm Arnold's Fantasy (great for intermediate students), and other contemporary, yet tuneful cello gems.

 

International Music Company 

What a complicated story. First of all, the Rose, Gingold, and Francescatti editions we grew up on were not engraved by IMC. They were "customized" from the first/second editions. Basically, they photocopied the first edition of, let's say, Lalo's concerto, whited out what they didn't want, and entered the new fingerings and bowings by Rose (which I hear is questionable). IMC was a pro at this. The "mistakes" that IMC is notorious for, many them are also found in the first/second editions. 

Supposedly, they did some engraving for Cassadó's arrangements in the 1940s, but I think that those editions were engraved by Schott (Cassadó's previous publisher), and then something happened to their contract which led IMC to publish those arrangements (Elfentanz, Minute Waltz, CPE Bach Concerto, Aeolian Etude, etc.). 

You can see IMC starting to engrave their own music in the software called "Score" for their Edmund Kurtz editions and later. From an era when Schirmer was producing beautiful scores of Adams and Corigliano's music engraved in Score, IMC was showing themselves as novices in contemporary music engraving techniques, and selling those, instead of hiring able engravers. Why would you expect anything else from a company that spent decades whiting out public domain music? 

I will give them credit for one thing, Soviet music. You can expect to buy the best sonata editions by Prokofiev, Shostakovich, and Kabalesky, as well as Shostakovich's 1st Concerto from IMC. That speaks to how bad the Sikorski edition of those pieces really is. 

Conclusion: If you really want Rose's fingerings, buy Henle and copy Rose's fingerings and bowings from a library copy. Just remember that there is no good edition of Rococo Variations. Get Soviet music from IMC.

 

Kunzelmann (associated with Schott and Eulenburg) 

Buy at your own risk. While their catalog looks impressive, their quality leaves a lot to be desired, especially at their astronomical prices. You might have bought their 6-cello arrangement of Popper's Requiem, 5-cello arrangement of the Carmen Suite, Chopin's Polonaise Brillante, or concertos by Monn, Weber, CPE Bach, which claim to be scholarly editions. Most of their cello transcriptions of violin rep done by Werner Thomas-Mifune have wrong key signatures and are sloppily done, usually transposed down a 5th. 

This year I've carefully reviewed their "scholarly" editions of CPE Bach A major concerto, Weber's Grand Potpourri, and a performance edition of the Lalo Sonata (which they maintain has scholarly aspects). Their edition of Lalo blindly copies all of the rhythmic mistakes and obvious wrong notes of the first edition, while adding dozens of new mistakes. 

The Weber edition has dozens of wrong notes, clefs, articulations, etc. When I say "wrong clefs," I mean that the notes are correctly placed on the staff if there was a different clef preceding them. 

The CPE Bach solo part has a page turn in the middle of practically every solo passage. They also claim to base their edition on the manuscript (which one?). Having seen both manuscripts of the cello concerto, basing my edition on one of these, I don't find their readings plausible. At best, the orchestra parts are ok for performance. Their suggested fingerings in the solo part make the piece more difficult than it is. Their critical notes spend most of the time comparing the cello, flute, and keyboard versions. 

Conclusion: avoid Kunzelmann if at all possible.

 

Edition Peters

Edition Peters, in addition to working with their own publications, is actually an umbrella company that also controls Belaieff, Schwann, and Kahnt. Belaieff was one of the publishers of Russian music from the Romantic Era; composers like Borodin, Taneyev, Glazunov, and others.  

Peters is the edition that comes to mind after Breitkopf for our core orchestra and solo repertoire. You might own Beethoven's Sonatas, Mendelssohn's cello works, Schumann's cello works, and Mozart and Haydn String Quartets in a Peters edition. These are trusty warhorses. 

Peters is also the publisher of Alan Hovhaness, George Crumb, Georgs Pelecis, and other modern and contemporary composers. Peters brought Soviet composers to Germany and the US, so you might also own a salmon-colored edition of Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Kabalevsky, Khachaturian, and others. 

Peters has dabbled in the "urtext" market but is not depending on it as their primary source of income. You might have run into the urtext edition of Rococo Variations, edited by Raphael Wallfisch. It's not my favorite (if there can be one for this piece). It's well-engraved but does contain dozens of errors beyond the sources for the piece. Just note that this is the original version of the piece (which I fully endorse). Peters is also working on urtext editions of Haydn, which are solid rivals to Henle. 

Conclusion: If I had a choice between my time-tested Peters copies of Beethoven quartets and Henle or Barenreiter, I would most likely stay with Peters and pencil in anything noteworthy from scholarly critical notes.

 

Ricordi 

In many ways, I would put Ricordi in the same category as Universal. Ricordi has exclusive rights to many 20th Century Italian composers, which makes this publisher unavoidable when looking to play Puccini, Respighi, and others. You will frequently encounter Verdi's music published by Ricordi (or reprinted from Ricordi by Luck's or Kalmus). 

For baroque music, there are editions of Degli Antonii (avoid), Bach Suites, Tartini and Leo concertos, and the complete Vivaldi edition. You will see many of the Vivaldi "Ricordi-urtext" posted on IMSLP, edited by Malipiero and Ephrikian. Don't buy into the "urtext" aspect of it. Although these editions use the manuscripts as sources, the editors freely added a bass part (different from the basso continuo) and an unreliable cembalo part. If you are a novice at Vivaldi, you might appreciate the prescriptivism, but period ensembles won't use these as printed. The alternative to Vivaldi would be the Ars Antiqua edition, which is not good either. I usually make my own editions of Vivaldi's concertos if I need to program them. 

For the classical period, we have Boccherini's sonatas and concertos. The sonatas were edited by Paternoster. They are pretty decent. There is nothing better on the market right now. Avoid the Piatti edition of the 6 sonatas. As of Boccherini's concertos edited by Aldo Pais, those are not reliable. You can still learn the pieces from these editions, though. Schott publishes 5 of the 12 concertos, too. Once again, you have to choose between two editions that are not that great. I hope that there will be a push to make a reliable complete Boccherini concerto edition that won't cost an arm and a leg. The Ricordi edition of the quintets by Boccherini is usable. 

Conclusion: Ricordi has a monopoly on much of Italian music from 1650-2020. The earlier the period, the less reliable the edition.

 

Schott 

If Breitkopf is the grandfather of all contemporary publishers, Schott is the great uncle, established in 1770. Schott is the publisher of everyone from Servais, Swert, Reinecke, to Cassadó (1930-1940), Hindemith (with a new complete edition currently being released), Penderecki, Henze, and Shchedrin. Your first edition of Haydn D was probably edited by Gendron, published by Schott. Many of the Gendron editions and Gendron-Françaix collaborations, including the Chopin Polonaise, were published by Schott, 

In the late 1800s, Schott published the "Cello Library," which included the Locatelli-Piatti Sonata, Breval-Cahnbley Sonata in G major, and many misattributed sonatas edited by Alfred Moffat, including the infamous Sammartini G major sonata (composed by Berteau, possibly after Dall'Abaco). 

Schott's more recent venture includes the complete edition of Tchaikovsky's music. Although the research is done by top scholars, the quality and accuracy are highly questionable due to poor proofreading (a general issue with the current state of Schott). 

Another recent edition with dozens of mistakes is their Saint-Saens Suite Op 16 and 16b companion. I recently published an urtext edition of the Suite Op. 16b. I've studied no fewer than 7 sources of the work, including the holograph MS of both the orchestra score and piano reduction, the edition proof, and the final printed score. The Schott edition of Op. 16b, edited by Maria Kliegel, copies every single mistake in the Hamelle piano reduction and adds at least a dozen more of its own mistakes. No edition can be farther from what Saint-Saens intended. 

Conclusion: For Cassadó, Hindemith, Penderecki, Henze, and Shchedrin, Schott is unavoidable at this point. You will have to hunt for inaccuracies yourself, or with an expert. Françaix's compositions and arrangements are worth exploring. Apart from the Gendron cadenza, I would prefer Henle's Haydn D edition, although I'm not a huge fan of that either. The Cello Library editions are interesting, but I would not use them in performances, especially Breval. Locatelli is decent (IMC reprints the Schott). Stay away from any Saint-Saens published by Schott. If you print Servais from IMSLP or get a reprint of any of those works, including the 6 Caprices, get ready to make corrections with a red pen.

 

Schirmer (US distributor Hal Leonard)  

There has been a lot of hostility towards Schirmer from the "urtext" supporters in the last couple of decades. Schirmer is faulted for changing the composer's intentions with extra markings. I would like to remind the readers who love to listen to the American greats from the 1930s to 1970s; their preferred edition was Schirmer. This publisher doesn't claim to be scholarly, but Schirmer makes excellent performers' editions. If you like someone's fingerings or bowings, use them, regardless of the publisher. Schirmer editions are very well engraved and they have their own signature look. That's more than one could say of Breitkopf and Simrock of the same period.  

Schirmer is the edition of the American greats like Barber, Copland, and Corigliano. Those first editions are incredibly consistent. Since Schirmer went to digital engraving, they've been the first in their class, IMHO. I daresay that they easily rival Henle in quality. Just look at their scores to Corigliano's The Red Violin.  

Conclusion: there is no shame in enjoying performing from your Schirmer score. Use it as a reference for fingering and bowings. Learn from the best musicians in the early to mid 20th century. 

 

Universal and Wiener Urtext 

When talking about 20th Century composers, we can't get around talking about Universal. Its catalog includes names like Gaspar Cassadó, Richard Strauss, Max Reger, Béla Bartók, Frederick Delius, Gustav Mahler, Arnold Schoenberg, Anton Webern, Alexander von Zemlinsky, Karol Szymanowski, Leoš Janáček, Kurt Weill, Alban Berg, Luciano Berio, Pierre Boulez, György Kurtág, György Ligeti and Karlheinz Stockhausen, Arvo Pärt, and others. Universal's cover pages and style very much reflected Art Nouveau. 

Universal did engrave their own editions of standard repertoire like Schubert's Trout Quintet, Beethoven's Sonatas, and such. They are comparable to Peters in quality, but definitely with their own signature look; no reprinting here. For anyone who has played Mahler and Strauss's works will note that Universal parts are quite messy. This is true, Universal made much better-looking scores than parts. Would you like the task of engraving orchestra parts for a Mahler or Strauss work? It's stressful just to think about. There is no excuse, though. Fortunately, Universal has re-engraved all of Mahler's symphonies. I got the chance to play Symphony No. 5 one of those. It was much better than the "old standard." Sadly, those parts are only available via rental. Universal's new engravings are basic, but they work, nothing special, but they are clean and accurate. 

What would our review be like if we don't mention the lawsuit threat Universal vs. IMSLP? Universal backed down because IMSLP's server is in Canada, not Austria. Remember, please, that each country has its own copyright law. I live in the US and abide by the US copyright law. If you live in the EU, you should abide by the EU copyright law. But please don't expect me to abide by the EU copyright law with regards to published works especially. If you live in Canada, you have the best copyright law in the Western world. Congratulations! 

Finally, Honda has Acura, Nissan has Infiniti, and Universal has Wiener Urtext. Wiener Urtext is Universal's urtext edition division. This catalog is quite modest, but it's of very high quality. If you can get your hands on it, I highly recommend their editions of Bach's Suites, Brahms's Sonatas, and Vivaldi's Sonatas. In fact, I would get the Wiener Urtext edition of Vivaldi, and avoid Bärenreiter at all costs, because of all of the misprints in Bärenreiter. 

Conclusion: for 20th Century music, you can't avoid getting the Universal Edition. If you buy an old engraving, check with the score to see if there are any inconsistencies in the part. The new engravings are pretty good.

 

YL Edition 

To wrap up my edition reviews, I thought it would be a good idea to review my own publishing company YL Edition. 

I started engraving when I was in high school, mostly interested in engraving my own compositions and making arrangements of violin and piano music. You can see some of my earliest work on IMSLP. I tried to imitate the style of the scores that I was arranging, so you will see that my layout and approach from Dvorak's Romance is very similar to Simrock (IMC reprint). 

I started selling my arrangements and compositions in the early 2010s, printing them at Staples and selling them on eBay. At that point, the goal was just to get the music in print for my own use and to share it with others. This is where most engravers end up. 

In 2016, I started making more editions to seriously increase the cello repertoire, which led me to step up my game and improve the quality of my engraving. This is when I went to a completely digital platform on Sheet Music Plus (SMP). My friend and professional engraver Michele Galvagno convinced me to switch from Finale to Sibelius, at which point my editions started becoming more consistent and clearer. The first edition I published using Sibelius was the Schumann Cello Concerto Critical Edition (technically urtext, because my main source was Schumann’s holograph MS, but I also included a couple of markings from the first edition). I was preparing to play Schumann with orchestra and could not find a reliable, clean edition. Breitkopf Urtext is published with Schiff's markings, which I don't like. 

After that, my catalog grew to include Telemann's Gamba Fantasias and Bach Suites (based on Kellner and Westphal), both of these being my bestsellers. I did not intend to sell the Bach initially, just preparing an edition for personal use, but the edition turned out well, and I was encouraged by colleagues that it was a good product. 

Most editions I publish still begin as projects for personal use or students. I conduct a string orchestra at Bob Jones University, which gives me an outlet for some bigger projects like the CPE Bach’s A major Concerto, Vivaldi Concertos, and various transcriptions of the symphonic repertoire. 

I have a research background, so many of my editions from the last 4 years are scholarly, for example, concertos by Schumann and Saint-Saens (No. 2 first urtext edition on the market), Bloch's Schelomo (first urtext edition on the market), baroque works, and many others. 

All of my research is self-funded, but I keep my prices low because I want to give back to the cello community. Many small businesses charge double or triple the price of what is considered competitive, but I charge what I would want to pay for my own edition minus the printing cost. Since my editions are all digital, I can update any typos right away for my customers to have the latest and best version of the edition. All downloads for updates are free of charge on SMP. This is something Henle also does with the in-app purchases with regards to misprints in their scores and the most recent printing. 

As of Fall 2020, YL Edition has an updated look, which uses custom-made fonts, designed especially for my company by Jawher Matmati. You will notice that French music uses the French C clef, and the rest of the music uses the "standard one." The idea of the different clef styles flowed out of my colleagues' complaint that Henle and Bärenreiter French music editions don't look "French enough." I really appreciate everyone's support of the YL Edition.

Critical Notes Series: David Popper's Work List and Editions 

Welcome to the most comprehensive list of David Popper's works available on the web. This list includes detailed information about each piece, including opus number, movement titles, dedications, and years of publication. Each title has been checked against primary sources such as title pages, original publisher catalogs, and genealogies. This list also includes contemporary scholarly and performance editions. You may also want to check IMSLP for many of the original sources.

With Opus Number

Op. 2 
Fünf Gesänge
Movements: 1. Im wunderschönen Monat Mai, 2. Und wüsstens die Blumen, 3. In einem kühlen Grunde, 4. Wie Schmetterlinge, 5. Ich will meine Seele tauchen
v pf 
Year of publication: 1865 July
First Edition: Simmel
Performance Edition: Paladino
Dedicated to Elisabeth von Metzdorff 

Op. 3 
Sechs Characterstücke
Movements: 1. Arlequin, 2. Warum?, 3. Erzählung, 4. Papillon, 5. Begegnung, 6. Lied
vc pf, 4. vc orch
Year of composition: ca. 1864
Year of publication: 1865 December, orch. in 1880
First Edition: Senff: plates 469-470
Dedicated to Constantin, Prince of Hohenzollern-Hechingen
Performance Edition(s): No. 4: IMC (Rose), Universal (Skocic); No. 5: Editio Musica Budapest (Pejtsik, Vol. 1); No. 6: Editio Musica Budapest (Pejtsik, Vol. 1)

Op. 5 
Romanze
vc pf 
Year of composition: ca. 1866
Year of publication: 1867 May
First Edition: Fritzsch: plate E.W.F. 5 L
Dedicated to Anna Mahlig
Other early editions: violin (or viola) and piano (Siegel, arr. Popper)

Op. 8 
Cello Concerto No. 1 in D minor
Movements: 1. Frisch und feurig, 2. Andante maestoso, 3. Lebhaft, quasi Recit. - Tempo di Polacca.
vc orch 
Year of composition: 1866
Year of publication: 1871 August, orch. 1872 January
First Edition: André. vc/pf and orch. plate 10261
Dedicated to Julius Goltermann 
Performance Edition(s): Paladino

Op. 10 
Sarabande and Gavotte
vc pf 
Year of composition ca. 1867 (performed as early as March 1867)
Year of publication: 1868 January
First Edition: André: plate 10061
Dedicated to Robert Emil Bockmühl
Urtext edition: YL Edition
 
Op. 11 
Drei Stücke
Movements: 1. Widmung (Dedication), 2. Humoreske, 3. Mazurka No. 1 in G minor 
vc pf 
Year of composition: ca. 1868 (Mazurka performed as early as March 1868)
Year of publication: 1874 December
First Edition: Senff: plate 1256 (separately 1257-1259)
Dedicated to 1. Sophie Menter, 2. Karl Davydov, 3. Bernhard Cossmann
Urtext Edition: YL Edition
Performance Edition(s): No. 3: Editio Musica Budapest (Pejtsik Vol. 2), IMC

Op. 12 
Mazurka No. 2 in D minor
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1874 October
First Edition: Gutmann; Hofmeister reprint: plate 7797
  
Op. 14 
Concert-Polonaise in D minor
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1878 January
First Edition: Senff: plate 1304
Dedicated to King William III of the Netherlands 
Urtext edition: YL Edition (in preparation)
Performance Edition(s): IMC (Solow), Ovation Press (Jensen)
 
Op. 16 
Suite for 2 Cellos
Movements: 1. Andante grazioso, 2. Gavotte, 3. Scherzo, 4. Largo espressivo, 5. Marcia
2vc or vc pf  
Year of publication: 1876 December
First Edition: Hofmeister: vc/pf plate 8107
Dedicated to Franz Hegenbart 
​Performance Edition(s): Paladino (cello/piano) (2 cellos)
 
Op. 16a 
Tempo di Marcia
2vc or vc pf 
Year of publication: 1879 November
First Edition: Hofmeister 
Alternative finale for the Suite, Op. 16 
Performance Edition(s): Paladino (cello/piano) (2 cellos)

Op. 18 
Sérénade orientale
vc pf or vc orch
Year of publication: 1878, orch. 1904 September
First Edition: Senff: vc/pf plate 1372
Dedicated to Contesse Stefanie de Wurmbrandt-Vrabély 
 
Op. 22 
Nocturne No. 1 in G major
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1879 September
First Edition: Hofmeister: plate 7811
Dedicated to Prinz Tenischeff (Vyacheslav Tenishev)
 
Op. 23 
Gavotte No. 2 in D major
vc pf or vc orch 
Year of publication: 1879 November, orch. 1900 June
First Edition: Hofmeister: vc/pf plate 7812
Dedicated to Senator A.N. Markewitsch (Andrey Nikolayevich Markovich)
Urtext edition: YL Edition
Performance edition(s): Editio Musica Budapest (Pejtsik, Vol. 2), IMC Rose
Other early editions: violin and piano (Hofmeister, plate 7838, arr. Auer), flute and piano (Hofmeister, September 1906, arr. Schwedler)

Op. 24
Cello Concerto No. 2 in E minor
Movements: Allegro moderato, 2. Andante, 3. Allegro molto moderato
vc orch 
Year of composition: ca. 1862. Premiered on 9 November 1862. Revised in 1879 and performed that version with the Gewandhaus Orchestra in Leipzig on 23 October 1879.
Year of publication: 1880 June, orch. 1880 June
First Edition: Hofmeister: vc/pf plate 7813; orch. score plate 7814; orch. parts plate 7815
 
Op. 27 
Präludium (Andante Serioso) and Gavotte No. 3
1. vc, 2. vc pf 
Year of publication: 1880 October
First Edition: Senff: plate 1507
Dedicated to Wilhelm Popper
Urtext edition: YL Edition
 
Op. 28 
Concert-Polonaise No. 2 in F major
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1880 May 
First Edition: Hofmeister: plate 7824
Urtext edition: YL Edition (in preparation)
 
Op. 32 
Zwei Stücke
Movements: 1. Nocturne No. 2, 2. Mazurka No. 3 in A major
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1880 September
First Edition: Rahter: 1. plate 2099; 2. plate 2100
Dedicated to 1. Adolf Henselt, 2. Colonel Jean Palansky 
Other early editions: 1. violin and piano (Rahter, plate 2409, arr. Sauret)
 
Op. 33 
Tarantella in G major
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1880 September
First Edition: Rahter: plate 2101
Dedicated to Jan Seifert. Orchestrated by Paul Gilson in June 1902. 
Urtext edition: YL Edition
​Performance Edition(s): IMC (Rose), Rahter (Popper), Schirmer (Starker, part of a collection)
Other early editions: piano 2 hands (Rahter, plate 2336, arr. Biehl), piano 4 hands (Rahter, plate 2479, arr. Kleinmichel)
 
Op. 35 
Zwei Stücke
Movements: 1. Trauermarsch, 2. Mazurka No. 4 in D major
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1880 October
First Edition: Rieter-Biedermann: plates [1110]-1111
Dedicated to 2. Henryk Wieniawski

Op. 38 
Barcarole
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1880 August
First Edition: Hofmeister: plate 7882
Dedicated to Frau Cecile Cohn-Holländer 
 
Op. 39 
Elfentanz
vc pf or vc orch 
Year of publication: 1881 September, orch. 1882 August
First Edition: Rahter: vc/pf plate 2207; orch. score plate 2262; orch. parts plate 2263
Dedicated to Franz Neruda 
Urtext edition: YL Edition
Performance Edition(s): Carl Fischer (Rostropovich), Faber (Isserlis), IMC (Fournier)
Other early editions: violin and piano (Rahter, plate 2555, arr. Halir), violin and piano (Rahter, plate 2410, arr. Sauret), piano (Rahter, plate 2240, arr. Rudolph Kündinger), piano (Rahter, plate 2276, Erleichterte Ausgabe)
 
Op. 40 
Lieder
1. Lass dich belauschen, du stille Nacht, 2. Ich liebe dich, 3. Suleikha: Nicht mit Engeln im blauen Himmelszelt
v (tenor) pf 
Year of publication: 1882 February
First Edition: Hofmeister 
Dedicated to Lorenzo Riese 
 
Op. 42 
Nocturne No. 3 in G major
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1882 September
First Edition: Ries & Erler 
Dedicated to Jules Delsart 
Other early editions: violin and piano (Ries & Erler, arr. F. Ries in A major)
 
Op. 43 
Fantasie über das Kleinrussiche Lied (Fantasy on Little Russian Songs) 
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1882 April
First Edition: Senff 
Performance edition(s): Master Music (Colon), Schott (Kliegel)
Notes: "Little Russia" is the old name for Ukraine 

Op. 46 
Zwei Transcriptionen 
Movements: 1. Schlummerlied aus der “Mainacht" by Rimsky-Korsakov, 2. Träumerei aus den “Kinderszenen” by Schumann
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1884 August
First Edition: Rahter: 1. plate 2491; 2. plate 2492
 
Op. 47 
Nocturne No. 4 in B minor
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1883 September
First Edition: Rahter: plate 2443
Dedicated to Fräulein Anna Hoskier (also the dedicatee of Saint-Saens's Op. 72)
 
Op. 48 
Menuetto No. 1 in D major
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1883 March
First Edition: André: plate 13140
Dedicated to John Grieg 
 
Op. 49 
Kaiser-Marsch zur Krönung Seiner Majestät Kaiser Alexander III 
orch or pf
Year of publication: 1883 September (pf)
First Edition: Rahter: piano, arr. Popper, plate 2448
 
Op. 50 
Im Walde
Movements: 1. Eintritt, 2. Gnomentanz, 3. Andacht, 4. Reigen, 5. Herbstblume, 6. Heimkehr
vc orch 
Year of publication: 1882 December (Originalausgabe), orch. 1883 August
First Edition: Rahter: vc/pf plate 2335 (separately, plates 351-356); orch. score plate 2469; orch. parts plate 2468
Dedicated to Frau Therese Henriques (Abrahamson)
Urtext edition: YL Edition (cello/piano), (orchestra score)
Performance Edition(s): Complete: Barenreiter (Rummel); No. 2: Editio Musica Budapest (Pejtsik, Vol. 1)
Other early editions: Complete:  piano (Rahter, plate 2478/separately plates 659-664, arr. Reinecke); 4 and 5. violin and piano (Rahter, plates 2757-2758, arr. Kühns)
 
Op. 51 
Mazurka No. 6 in C major
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1884 December
First Edition: André: plate 13186
Dedicated to Carl R. Stasny
 
Op. 52 
Feuillet d'album & Mazurka fantastique (No. 5)
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1883 August
First Edition: Rahter: plates 2444-2445
Dedicated to King Dom Louis I of Portugal 
Performance Edition(s): Editio Musica Budapest (Pejtsik, Vol. 2)
Other early editions: 1. violin and piano (Rahter: plate 2759, arr. Kühns)
 
Op. 54 
Spanische Tänze
Movements: 1. Zur Gitarre, 2. Serenade, 3. Spanischer Carneval, 4. L'Andalouse, 5. Vito 
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1883 November
First Edition: Rahter: plates 2446, 2447, 2490, 2670, 2671
Dedicated to 1 & 2. Aleksandr Verzhbilovich, 3. Count Guillermo Morphy, 4 & 5. Heinrich Grünfeld. Orchestrated by Jacobus Hendrik Oushoorn in May 1906.
Performance Edition(s): Complete: Paladino; No. 1: Universal (Skocic) No. 2 IMC (Rose), Universal (Skocic); No. 5 IMC (Rose), Editio Musica Budapest (Pejtsik, Vol. 2)
Other early editions: 1 and 2. violin and piano (Rahter, plates 2760-2761, arr. Kühns), 1 and 2. piano (Rahter, plates 2615-2616, arr. Kirchner)
 
Op. 55 
Zwei Concert-Etüden
Movements: 1. Spinnlied, 2. Jagdstück 
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1884 July 
First Edition: Rahter: plates 2513-2514
Dedicated to Julius Klengel 
Urtext edition: YL Edition
Performance Edition(s): No. 1: IMC; No. 2: Universal (Skocic)
Other early editions: 1. violin and piano (Rahter, plate 2844, arr. Auer), 1. piano (Rahter, plate 2515, arr. Kirchner), 1. piano 4 hands (Rahter, plate 1150, arr. Pavelko)
 
Op. 57 
Tarentella No. 2 in D major
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1885 June
First Edition: Rahter: plate 2551
Dedicated to Hugo Becker 
Urtext edition: YL Edition
Other early editions: violin and piano (Rahter, plate 2762, arr. Kühns)
 
Op. 59 
Cello Concerto No. 3 in G major (in one movement)
vc orch 
Year of publication: 1888 September, orch. 1889 October 
First Edition: Rahter: vc/pf plate 2800; orch. score plate 2798; orch. parts plate 2799
Dedicated to Kaiserl. Russischen Staatsrath von Ogarew 
Performance Edition(s): Paladino (cello/piano), orchestra score
 
Op. 60 
Walzer-Suite
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1890 June
First Edition: Rahter: plate 2953
Dedicated to Madame Anna Traub 
Performance Edition(s): Paladino
 
Op. 62 
Drei Stücke
Movements: 1. Mémoire, 2. Chanson villageoise, 3. Berceuse
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1889 December
First Edition: Senff: plates 2089.2090-2089.2092
Dedicated to Max Rothauer 
Performance Edition(s): No. 1: Editio Musica Budapest (Pejtsik, Vol. 1); No. 2: Editio Musica Budapest (Pejtsik, Vol. 2), IMC, Universal (Skocic); No. 3: Editio Musica Budapest (Pejtsik, Vol. 1)
 
Op. 64 
Drei Stücke
Movements: 1. Wie einst in schöner’n Tagen, 2. Tarantella No. 3 in A major, 3. Wiegenlied
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1892 August (Breitkopf), 1892 October (Rahter)
First Edition: Breitkopf; Rahter: plates 59-61
Dedicated to 1. Popper's parents, 2. Jean Gérardy, 3. Olga Popper 
Urtext edition: YL Edition
Performance Edition(s): No. 1: Editio Musica Budapest (Pejtsik, Vol. 1), IMC (Fournier); No. 3: Editio Musica Budapest (Pejtsik, Vol. 2)

Op. 65 
Drei Stücke
Movements: 1. Adagio, 2. Menuetto No. 2 in D major, 3. Polonaise No. 3 in D major
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1891 April (1), September (2), October (3)
First Edition: Hofmeister: 8183-8185
Dedicated to 1. Alwin Schroeder, 2. Sigmund Berger, 3. Rudolf André 
Urtext edition: YL Edition (in preparation)
Performance Edition(s): No. 2: Editio Musica Budapest (Pejtsik, Vol. 1)
 
Op. 66 
Requiem
3vc orch 
Year of publication: 1892 August
First Edition: Rahter: 3vc/pf plate 64; orch. score plate 62; orch. parts plate 63 
Dedicated to the memory of Daniel Rahter 
Urtext edition: YL Edition
 
Op. 67 
Zwei Stücke im alten Style
Movements: 1. Largo, 2. Gavotte No. 4 D minor
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1894 May (copyright on the music is 1892, but it wasn't released until 1894)
First Edition: Hofmeister: plate 8786
Dedicated to 1. Queen Victoria of Balmoral, 2. Henri Eugène Dumont-Saint-Priest  
Urtext edition: YL Edition
Performance Edition(s): Editio Musica Budapest (Pejtsik, Vol. 1)
Notes: Arranged for mandolin and piano by Pasquale Dabiero as "Largo a l'ancienne mode" under Op. 69 by Robert Cocks & Co. 
 
Op. 68 
Ungarische Rhapsodie (Hungarian Rhapsody)
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1894 June
First Edition: Hofmeister: vc/pf plate 8368; orch. score plate 8661; orch. parts plate 8662
Dedicated to Jean Gérardy. Orchestrated by Max Schlegel in December 1902 (Copyright date is 1894 in the orchestra score). 
Urtext edition: YL Edition
​Performance Edition(s): Carl Fischer (Malkin), Hofmeister (Popper, reprinted by Kalmus), IMC (Rose), Schirmer (Starker, part of a collection), Universal (Skocic)
 
Op. 69 
Suite in A major
Movements: 1. Allegro giojoso, 2. Tempo di Menuetto, 3. Ballade, 4. Finale
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1897 September
First Edition: Peters: plate 2241
Dedicated to Freiherrn Ferdinand von Liliencron 
Performance Edition(s): Paladino
Other early editions: 2. cello and piano (Peters, plate 2953)

Op. 70 
Drei Stücke
1. In der Dämmerung, 2. Im Sonnenschein, 3. Ballet-Scene
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1900 May
First Edition: Senff (Simrock): plate 22429
Dedicated to 1. Dr. Oscar Friedeberg, 2. Maximilian Bruno Niederberger, 3. none
 
Op. 71 
Schottische Fantasie (Scotch Fantasia)
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1900 June
First Edition: Hofmeister: plate 8602
Dedicated to Franklin Petersen of Edinburgh 
Performance Edition(s): IMC (Solow)
 
Op. 72 
Concerto No. 4 in B minor
Movements: 1. Allegro moderato, 2. Lento assai, 3. Scherzo. Allegro ma non troppo, 4. Allegro non troppo
vc orch
Year of composition: ca. 1864
Year of publication: 1900 November, orch. 1901 February
First Edition: Hofmeister: vc/pf plate 8603
Dedicated to Alfredo Piatti 

Op. 73 
Hohe Schule des Violoncello-Spiels (High School of Cello Playing)
vc 
Year of publication: Book 1: 1901 July; Book 2: 1902 January; Book 3: 1902 November; Book 4: 1905 June
First Edition: Hofmeister: plates 2952-2955
Dedicated to Alwin Schroeder (Book 1), Bernhard Schmidt (Book 2), Edouard Jacobs (Book 3), Ödön (Edmund) von Mihalovich (Book 4).
Originally published in 4 volumes. 
Performance Edition(s): Barenreiter (Rummel), IMC (reprint of the first edition), Paladino (Rummel, updated), Schirmer (reprint of the first edition)

Op. 74 
String Quartet in C minor
2vn va vc 
Year of publication: 1905 June
First Edition: Hofmeister: score plate 8703; parts plate 8704
Dedicated to the Bohemian Quartet 
 
Op. 75 
Drei Stücke
1. Sérénade, 2. Gavotte No. 5 in A Major, 3. Barcarolle Vénitienne
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1907 September
First Edition: Hofmeister
Urtext edition: YL Edition
 
Op. 76 
10 Mittelschwere grosse Etüden (10 Studies Preparatory to the High School of Cello Playing)
vc 
Year of publication: 1906 September
First Edition: Hofmeister: plate 8790
Performance Edition(s): IMC (reprint of the first edition), Paladino

Op. 76a 
15 Leichte Etüden in der ersten Lage (15 Etudes in First Position)
2vc 
Year of publication: 1911 March
First Edition: Hofmeister 
Performance Edition(s): IMC (reprint of the first edition)

Op. 81 
Gavotte (No. 6) in A major
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1911 May
First Edition: Ries & Erler: plate 8538
Urtext edition: YL Edition

 

Without opus number (in chronological order)

Konzertstück for Violin and Cello
vl vc orch (pf)
Year of composition: ca. 1863. Performed as early as April 1863 with court violinist Julius Stern
Dedicated to Julius Stern

Tarantella in A minor for Violin and Orchestra
vl pf (orch)
Year of composition: 1864, for 3 January 1865 performance
Dedicated to Julius Stern

Was mich zu dir so mächtig zog
v pf  
Year of publication: 1884  
First edition: Tonger: plate P.J.T. 3031 
Librettist Maximilian Bern  

Ave Maria gratia plena 
v vc pf  
Year of publication: 1898  
First Edition: Hamelle  
Dedicated to Cécile Dumont-Saint-Priest. Alternative title: Notre Dame de Londres 

Cello Concerto in C Major
Movements: 1. Allegro moderato, 2. Andante, 3. Allegretto vivace  
vc orch  
Year of publication: 1899 October
First Edition: Ries & Erler: vc/pf plate 6821
This concerto used to be attributed to Joseph Haydn.

Au Printemps! Suite de 12 morceaux originaux
vn pf 
Year of publication: 1902 
First Edition: Hamelle

Chant du Soir  
vc pf  
Year of publication: 1910 April
First Edition: Harmonia (Universal): plate H. 688
Alternative title: Evening Song 

Improvisation über Richard Wagners Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg
vc pf 
Year of publication: 1914 April
First Edition: André: plate 16674

Fünf Kadenzen für Violoncell
Contents: Haydn - Cello Concerto in D major; Saint-Saëns - Concerto in A minor, Op. 33; Volkmann: Cello Concerto in A minor; Schumann - Cello Concerto in A minor, Op. 129; Molique - Cello Concerto in D major
vc
Year of publication: 1924
First Edition: Harmonia (Universal):

 

Collections

Popper-album
Contents: Andante from Concerto, Op.24; Barcarolle, Op. 38; Adagio, Op. 65, No. 1; Largo, Op. 67, No. 1; Gavotte, Op. 67, No. 2
vc pf
Year of publication: 1906 November
First Edition: Hofmeister: plate 8786

 

Arrangements

Perles Musicales (Companion to the violin series by Marcello Rossi)

Contents:

1. Schubert: Du bist die Ruh, D. 776 (André. March 1883) 
2. Pergolesi: Tre giorni son che Nina (André. April 1883) 
3. Rubinstein, Melodie Op. 3 No. 1 (arr. in D major, orig. key: F major) (André. December 1884) 
4. Chopin, Nocturne Op. 9 No. 2 (André. December 1884) 
5. Schumann: Traumerei, Op. 15 No. 7 (arr. Davydov [Davidoff]) (André. October 1887) 
6. Tchaikovsky, Chanson sans paroles Op. 2 No. 3 (arr. in A major, orig. key: F major) (André. December 1884) 
7. Jensen: Murmelndes Lüftchen, Op. 21 No. 4 (André. March 1887) 
8. Jámbor: Nocturne Op. 8, No. 1 (André. October 1896) 
9. Tchaikovsky: Chanson triste, Op. 40 No. 2 (André. October 1896) 
10. Schumann: Abendlied Op. 85 No. 12 (André. October 1896) 
11. Schubert: Ave Maria, D. 839 (André. November 1898) 
12. Campioni: Menuetto Pastorale (André. August 1903) 
13. Purcell: Air from Dioclesian (André. August 1903) 
14. Giordani: Caro mio ben, Air (André. August 1903) 
15. Cherubini: Ave Maria (André. August 1903) 
16. Tchaikovsky: Barcarolle Op. 37 No. 6 (Hamelle. December 1907; André. October 1908) 
17. Tchaikovsky: Perce-Neige Op. 37 No. 4 (Hamelle. December 1907; André. October 1908) 
18. Tchaikovsky: Chant d’Automne Op. 37 No. 10 (erroneously No. 11 in André) (Hamelle. December 1907; André. October 1908) 
19. Handel, Largo (from Xerxes) (André. September 1910) 
20. Handel: Sarabande (André. September 1910) 
21. Bach: Arie aus der D-dur Suite (BWV 1068) (André. October 1911) 
22. Schumann: Schlummerlied (André. October 1911) 
23. Schubert: Der Neugierige (André. November 1912) 
24. Schubert: Sei Mir gegrüsst (André. November 1912) 
25. Schubert: Litanie auf das Fest ‘Allerseelen’ (André. November 1912) 
26. Schubert: An die Musik, Op. 88, No. 4 (André. November 1912) 
27. Mendelssohn: Auf Flügeln des Gesanges (André. November 1912) 
28. Mendelssohn: Reiselied, Op. 19, No. 6 (André. November 1912)

 

Wagner: Romanze (In das Album der Fürstin Metternich)
Year of publication: 1874
Publisher: Fritzsch

Editions

Mendelssohn
Zwei Sonaten (Opp. 45 & 58)
Universal Edition (U.E. 542)

Cellist bio: Friedrich von Mulert 

Friedrich von Mulert (AKA Friedrich Vilgelmovich and Fedor Vasilievich Mulert (19 June 1859, Mitau, now Jelgava, Latvia - 1924, Kyiv, Ukraine) - cellist and teacher. In 1884 he graduated with a medical degree from the Yuryevsky University (now University of Tartu), and in 1886 graduated from the St. Petersburg Conservatory from the cello class of Karl Davydov. In the same year, he settled in Kyiv. He taught cellists Mark Yampolsky, Lev Berezovsky, Zinoviy Dynov, B. Sikora. He was the principal cellist in Kyiv, as well as in St. Petersburg. His first concert in St. Petersburg included Anton Rubinstein's Cello Concerto No. 1. Mulert's performing style was distinctly noble. Wrote 3 cello concertos, several short pieces, as well as etudes and exercises. Mulert's works were published by Bessel and Jurgenson, upon Tchaikovsky's recommendation.

(pictured to the right) Erdenko (Violin 1), Kaspin (Violin 2), Ryb (Viola), Mulert (Cello) - 1886

(Most of the information comes from the out-of-print Russian book by Lev Ginzburg (1965). History of the Art of the Violoncello. Vol.3.)                                                                         

 

 

Critical Notes Series: Servais's Barber of Seville Fantasia 

Opera fantasias were a way of life for musicians of the Romantic era. They grew out of the potpourri and variation genres of the late 1700s. Opera fantasias could be as simple as a medley of short themes, as with Vasa Laub's potpourris, or as intricate as Tchaikovsky's Romeo & Juliet and Hamlet Overture-Fantasias. Technically, many opera overtures from the Romantic era are also fantasias, as they use and develop themes from the opera that follows, as in the case of Glinka's Ruslan & Ludmila and Verdi's Nabucco. 

Most of the fantasias that come down to us as standard repertoire lie somewhere in the middle. To avoid the simplicity of a medley, some composers added flashy, virtuosic aspects, like in Sarasate's Zigeunerweisen and Carmen Fantaisie, and Wieniawski's Faust. As a side note, pieces like Hungarian rhapsodies also belong to the fantasia genre, but they use a different style of music as their source. Some opera fantasias take the variation form, where they have an introduction, a set of variations on a single theme, and a coda. This is the case with Paganini's I Palpiti (based on Rossini's I Tancredi) and Variations on One Strings (based on the Preghiera from Rossini's Moses in Egypt). These variations get quite virtuosic with arpeggios, harmonics, and complex bow techniques.

Some composers joined forces to compose a fantasia. For example, Chopin and Franchomme composed the Grand Duo Concertant, based on Meyerbeer's Robert le Diable. Leonard and Servais composed the Grand Duo de Concert, based on God Save the King and Yankee Doodle. In the case of Chopin and Franchomme, the sections composed by the respective person is painfully obvious; the instruments go on playing their respective melodies for too long.

Servais was one of the more imaginative fantasia composers. His Fantaisie sur deux Airs Russes, Op. 13 (published 1854, composed earlier) uses the double variation form, meaning that the first theme gets its own set of variations, followed by a second theme that receives the same treatment, followed by a coda. Wieniawski wrote his Airs Russes, Op. 6, using one of the same melodies (Red Sarafan) as Servais.

One of the most interesting of Servais's fantasias is the Grande Fantaisie sur des motifs de l'Opéra le Barbier de Séville de Rossini, Op. 6. This fantasia is in 4 parts, resembling a mini sonata. As the title states, it uses Rossini's themes from the Barber of Seville. The opening theme, in B-flat major, is a fragmentation of the "buona sera" motif, which Servais expands into a lively polonaise. This polonaise is then interrupted by a B-flat minor theme borrowed from the Finale of Act 1:

The "polonaise" resumes and moves toward a transition to section 2, which is also borrowed from the Finale of Act 1.

Section 2 is a set of two variations on "Buona sera" from Act 2.


Variation 1 explores the up-bow staccato technique and trill patterns. Variation 2 is a march, continuing to use up-bow staccato, but now with double-stops. 

Section 3 is based on the Count's aria "Ecco, ridente il cielo" from Act 1. The cello first takes the virtuosic part of the winds, and then continues with the Count's Cavatina. Although the tempo never changes in the fantasia, a portion of the cabaletta "oh, Sorte," is also quoted.

A short cadenza leads to the Finale, based on "Bricconi, birbanti" from Act 2, followed by "La testa vi gira."

The Coda features the famous "Rossini crescendo" as the cello repeats a short octave passage.

Critical Notes Series: Servais's 6 Caprices 

Say the word "caprice," and our minds immediately go to Paganini and Piatti. However, other composers also wrote caprices as studies, among them François Servais (1807-66). Servais was a Belgian cello virtuoso and composer. As was typical of the Romanic Era composers, the bulk of his output included opera fantasies and variations on popular themes. Our new edition of Servais's 6 Caprices is based on the two first editions, Richault (French) and Schott (German), graciously provided by the Servais Society, faithfully combined into a beautiful, newly engraved, critical edition. Our edition is the first to include a score of the two cello parts. All the textual variants between the two first editions are noted in the footnotes. Our edition also comes with separate parts, which include Servais's original fingerings. 

Servais brings different styles of playing to each Caprice. Caprice No. 1 explores legato arpeggios in ABAB form. The arpeggios are within an octave spread, many of them fully diminished seventh harmonies. The B section is called "Chansonnette Flamande" (Little Flemish Song). This song recalls "The Itsy-Bitsy Spider," a children's song sung in English-speaking countries. Caprice No. 2 is a perpetual motion in rondo form, exploring the spiccato bow stroke. Caprice No. 3 explores legato string crossings between two adjacent strings. Caprice No. 4 is a da capo aria with a bit of a Spanish flair and hurdy-gurdy type of accompaniment. The transition back to the A section is a recitativo secco. Caprice No. 5 is a slow-tempo study in double stops and trills. Caprice No. 6 is another legato arpeggio study, now exploring octaves, tenths, and twelfths. 

Note on slurring: Occasionally, Servais writes a slur over two notes of the same pitch, as in m. 1 of Caprice No. 1. Those two notes should have a slight separation between them. 

Other times, Servais writes a slur over two notes that are tied. The tied notes should be played as a single note, with no separation, as in mm. 37 and 39 of Caprice No. 1. 

Special thank you to Peter François (President of the Servais Society) for offering his expertise.