Musings

Critical Notes Series: Dvořák's Cello Concerto 

Historically, Dvořák's B-minor Cello Concerto, arguably, has only been rivaled by Haydn's D-major Concerto with its endurance in cello history. Although, the work has gained more competitors later in the 20th Century in concertos by Schumann, Prokofiev, Shostakovich, and others. Dvořák's Concerto has grown in popularity as a research topic, from technique to composition style, to its role in the cello repertoire. We have come a long way from the reader-digest style program notes that talk about the Concerto's relation to the Op. 82 song "Leave me alone" in dedication to his sister-in-law, and the thematic similarities to the New World Symphony.

To date, there have been no fewer than four scholarly editions of the Concerto published, including Supraphon (ed. Bartoš, 1955), Breitkopf (ed. Döge, 2001), Bärenreiter (ed. Del Mar, 2011), and Henle (ed. Oppermann, 2021). There is also a compendium to the Concerto by Jan Smaczny in the Cambridge Music Handbook series. The forewords, commentaries, and appendices of the abovementioned editions are all quite interesting and informative, especially those put together by Otakar Šourek for the Supraphon Complete Dvořák Edition, which contains the printed alternative versions from the autograph.

Since 2017, or perhaps 2012 to be more accurate, I've been working on my edition of Dvořák's Concerto, more specifically, the cello part with all of its variants. The question I ask myself often is "what can I offer the cello community?" With over 70 urtext editions in my catalog, I did not want to make just another Dvořák cello part to rival the big publishers. I wanted to provide a resource for my colleagues and students to use as a guide alongside their favorite edition.

My new edition, currently available free of charge at my website music store, is an engraving of all 5 currently available sources: first edition orchestra score (March 1896), first edition solo part (March 1896), first edition piano reduction (March 1896), orchestra autograph, and the anonymous manuscript of the solo part, presumably prepared for the United States premiere of the work.

Because this Concerto enjoys great popularity, it has been surrounded by mysteries and myths. I am not on a journey to solve any mysteries and am skeptical of those who claim that they have solved/almost solved the mystery of the source transmission, or have identified all/most of the errors in the sources. What we know for a fact is that Simrock published the orchestra score, orchestra parts, piano reduction, and the solo part in March 1896. There is no question about this happening. All of the printed sources were printed with Dvořák's approval. However, there are differences between the solo line in the orchestra and piano scores, as well as the separate cello part.

Myth #1: the solo staves in the piano score and orchestra score are the same. They are not remotely the same. When we analyze the sources we must take into account the pitches, rhythms, articulations, tempo, expressive and dynamic texts (and their placement), hairpins, slurs/ties, and even the beaming, to name just a few things. The cello line in the piano score can be seen as a middle ground between the orchestra score and the solo part, but it is a source all on its own with unique features. The autograph piano reduction does not have a cello line above it, hence we must accept that the piano reduction engraver had a unique source to work from. A reputable engraver does not make unapproved changes.

Myth #2: the orchestra score is fraught with errors. What we may conclusively claim as erroneous is what Dvořák called an error; the rest of the "errors" are either circumstantial or are in fact variants. Some examples of errors that I spot are the following: the 3 bars of rest in the first movement m. 268 of the solo part; the staccato dot on the half note in the second movement m. 9 of the solo part; missing trill accidentals in the third movement mm. 338-346 of the printed sources and autograph orchestra score. Many of the other readings are simply variants. Some of the common variants are the F# vs G in m. 90 of the first movement, the pianissimo vs mezzo forte in m. 223 of the first movement, beats 3 and 4 of m. 298 of the first movement, G-natural vs G# in m. 314 of the first movement, 8th vs 16th note in mm. 75 and 496 of the third movement, quarter note vs two 8th notes in m. 175 of the third movement, etc.

Myth #3: the simplified version of mm. 257-260 in the first movement originates with Emanuel Feuermann. This pattern of notes appeared in the second printing of the solo part within Dvořák's lifetime. The first and second printings of the solo part are identical in every respect except for those 4 bars. It is true that the original descending pattern is quite challenging. This is why the alternative was provided in subsequent printings, which can be found in the music archives of most cellists who played the Concerto in the early 20th Century. The famous, double-stop "Casals" version of this passage is simply the second-printing version filled out.

Myth #4: the anonymous manuscript is not relevant to the published solo part. While this source contains the original, shorter coda of the finale, many peculiarities found in the published solo part are also found in this manuscript, such as the G in the first movement m. 90, the 3-bar-rest error in m. 268 of the same movement, most of the beaming, bowings, and cues. There is no doubt that this manuscript is part of the transmission history of the solo part. One peculiar vestige from this manuscript is found in the "molto espressivo" marking in m. 347 of the third movement. The melody that was there originally would have worked well to be "very expressive," but the 6 bars of trills do not make sense. Three other sources leave "molto espressivo" in m. 347, while the published solo part moves it to a better place of m. 355. Another interesting thing to note is that the manuscript solo part contained many of the revisions done in red ink in the autograph score, yet had empty bar gaps in places where Dvořák was not settled on the reading. Some of the readings in the manuscript solo part ended up being published ossias. This is an important document in the solo part transmission. I would like to thank Jeff Solow for introducing me to this source.

Herman Whitfield III: A Tribute 

Herman Whitfield III (October 29, 1982 — April 25, 2022)

Herman and I entered the Cleveland Institute of Music for our graduate studies at the same time. We became friends almost immediately because we shared a love for composition as well as performance. Near the end of our first year of grad school, he invited me to play a song cycle he composed for voice, guitar, and string sextet based on the poem "Donal Og" by Lady Augusta Gregory. If my memory serves me well, we premiered the work on degree recital by the singer Caroline Kuehn. You may hear the entire work below.

I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.

Herman was an amazing pianist, so full of feeling and grandeur, but what an amazing pianissimo he could produce. Although we were the same height, his hands were probably 50% larger than mine. He was a big guy, but even in his most passionate conversation, he was kind, respectful, and relatively soft-spoken. 

His favorite composer was Gabriel Fauré. I thought it was an odd choice at the time. When Herman first told me about his favorite composer, I said something like "I guess I enjoy his earlier works." Herman responded, "I love his late works, the later the better." I thought to myself "how can you tolerate that harmonic language?" As a cellist, my main exposure to Fauré was through the Elegie and Sicilienne. I hated to admit that Fauré also had two cello sonatas from his late period.

Herman's second master's recital had two works on it: Schubert's G-major piano sonata and his own second violin sonata. The violin sonata was in the unusual key of C# minor. I remember Herman sitting in the CIM computer lab composing the work. Sometimes that small computer lab was stuffed with 25-30 people. I think it had 15 workstations. I asked Herman how he could stand composing in such a loud environment. He told me that he was used to it from home.

He premiered the sonata with the violinist Ariel Clayton (Karas). From the first note, I was captivated. The first movement is so warm and dark, going between C# minor and D-flat major. The second movement is a graceful minuet with a scherzo middle section. The last movement is a perpetual motion with sparkling motives and repeated notes. The middle section is a peaceful chant, which is later combined with the perpetual motion at the end. The entire sonata lasts about 40 minutes.

After the concert, I told Herman that I want to play the sonata on cello. He sent me the music and we started looking for a venue to play. The concert was going to also include one of my works and Fauré's second cello sonata. I had warmed up a little to the late Fauré sound by then. This concert never materialized, but I kept Herman's work in mind. 

The following year, I had a venue and the opportunity to play Herman's sonata. I worked quite a bit with the pianist Liz De Mio so I asked her if she wanted to learn the sonata. After she kindly declined, because of the incredible difficulty of the piano part, I asked her if she would mind if I invite Herman to play half of the recital. Liz agreed to share the piano and Herman agreed to come from Indianapolis to play his sonata with me. The recital also included Chopin's Polonaise Brillante, Suk's Serenade, and Khachaturian's Concerto Rhapsody. The performance took place at Judson Manor at University Circle in August 2009. Here is the recording of the sonata from that performance.

I. Adagio melancolio, solo e distante
II. Allegro grazioso
III. Allegro ma non troppo

He said that the cello captured the essence of what he imagined better than the violin, especially in the finale. When Herman returned to Indianapolis, he told me that he began composing a cello sonata for us to play. I don't know if he ever finished the work. When I visited Indianapolis in 2013 for an audition, Herman and I got to catch up a bit. He told me that he had gotten a job in Florida and was moving there soon. We kept in touch sporadically since then. I've thought about offering Herman to make an edition of the sonata so other people could enjoy playing it.

I am very saddened to hear about Herman's death at such a young age. I hope that his memory will live on through his music. Please enjoy his other works on his YouTube channel.

Cellist bio: Mikhail Bukinik 

(This biography was excerpted from Lev Ginsburg's Volume 3 of "The Art of the Violoncello" pp. 310-314, translated by Yuriy Leonovich).

Born in 1872 to a poor Kharkiv family [in Dubno], Mikhail Evseevich Bukinik received his initial education at the city public school [in Kharkiv]. Early musical talent and love for the cello led him in 1885 to the Musical College of the Kharkiv branch of the Russian Musical Society (RMS), where he became a student of A. E. Glehn (Alfred von Glehn). When, two years later, Karl Davydov gave concerts in Kharkiv, he auditioned the young cellist and encouraged him to continue his work.

In 1890, when moving to the Moscow Conservatory, A. E. Glehn took with him Bukinik (as well as Isaac Ilyich Dubinsky). In the second half of the year, Bukinik was accepted for probation into his class. In 1892, already at the soiree, he played the first movement of Davydov's Concerto No. 2, and then publicly performed the first part of Schumann's concerto. In the following period, he repeatedly performed at student and open soirees, mainly playing works by Davydov and Tchaikovsky. The seriousness of Mikhail Bukinik's musical tastes is evidenced by his interest in chamber music, which manifested itself already in his student years. In addition to participating in cello ensembles (at the soirees in memory of N. G. Rubinstein, he participated in the performance of Fantasia for five cellos and double bass by K. Schubert and with I. Dubinsky played Popper's Suite for two cellos), he repeatedly performed in ensembles with piano, as well as in quartet (with K. Saradzhev, R. Gliere, and A. Medtner). In 1894, together with V. Maurina and G. Dulov, he performed the Mendelssohn trio (d-moll). In the same concert, Bukinik played pieces by Davydov, Tchaikovsky, Popper, and his classmate F. Bubek.

In the last year of his stay at the conservatory (1895), Bukinik performed Davydov’s “Fantasy on Russian Songs” with an orchestra conducted by V. I. Safonov, and at the annual concert, he performed with Davydov’s Allegro de concert. The young cellist's preference for the works of Davydov showed Bukinik and his teacher's respect for the "patriarch of the Russian cello school", their desire to instill and continue his direction. 

Mikhail Bukinik graduated from the conservatory with a diploma of a free artist and a silver medal; in addition, he was presented with a cello and given a subsidy for a trip abroad; he took advantage of this subsidy in 1898.

Prior to that, he gave concerts in Moscow; known, for example, his performance with A. B. Goldenweiser of Rubinstein's Sonata in 1897. Having gone to Berlin for improvement (where he, apparently, consulted with Hugo Becker), he also performed in concerts here. 

After returning to Moscow in 1899, Bukinik received an offer to teach at the Musical College of the Saratov branch of the RMS. M. E. Bukinik worked in Saratov for five years, by no means limiting himself to teaching. He did a lot for the musical and in general for the cultural life of the city; arranged concerts and literary and musical evenings, gave lectures and collaborated in the press, contributed to the organization of an art exhibition, etc. 

In the chamber concerts organized by him, the best classical and modern works were played. For example, in 1902 Saratov music lovers heard Beethoven's trio (Avierino, Medzhevitenko, Bukinik), Rubinstein's Sonata (Goldenweiser, Bukinik), and Schumann's sonata (Goldenweiser). In 1904, Mikhail Bukinik organized an "Evening of New Art" in Saratov, in which he himself performed Rachmaninov's sonata (with A. B. Goldenveizeram) and Rebikov's works. 

From time to time, he came to Moscow. So in 1900, in the symphony concert of the RMS in memory of N. G. Rubinstein, Bukinik played with the orchestra under the direction of V. I. Safonov, Tchaikovsky’s Variations on a Rococo Theme, still rarely performed at that time. The review of this performance said: "Mr. Bukinik performed With Tchaikovsky's forgotten Variations on a Rococo Theme for Cello and Orchestra. This work was written in 1878 and then performed by Fitzenhagen (to whom it is dedicated), but since then it has been completely undeservedly forgotten, and only now, thanks to Mr. Bukinik, they have again gained access to concert programs. The beautiful variations of Tchaikovsky were conveyed by the young artist very gracefully, with technical completeness. In his playing, with a somewhat weak tone, there is a lot of melodiousness. He phrases with musicality. At the end of the number, the audience rewarded the artist with applause and forced him to play an encore." 

In 1904, Bukinik left Saratov and soon went abroad, where he stayed until 1906. We learn about his life during this period in Germany, France, and Switzerland from his surviving letters to V. V. Maslovskaya in Saratov. After a two-month stay in Berlin, Bukinik accepted in 1905 an invitation to take the place of soloist in the symphony orchestra in Görlitz; weekly he played solo with an orchestra and also participated in a quartet. He writes about the exceptional public interest in Russian music (especially Tchaikovsky) and Russian musicians. “Of course, I play only Russian authors," Bukinik writes on February 3, 1905. "I really like Arensky. Rachmaninov's Sonata, it seems, was not to their taste; they did not understand it. But [Paul ] Juon was a great success." 

One of the attached newspaper clippings says: “The new soloist, cellist of our city orchestra, Bukinik from Moscow, showed himself to be an outstanding artist, playing Tchaikovsky's Rococo Variations, which had not yet been performed here. Mr. Bukinik played this graceful piece with great musicality, confidence, wide and melodious bowing, and lightness in passages and strokes. His fine instrument sounded great in the Great Hall of the Philharmonic. Thunderous applause was the response to this artistic performance."

Despite the success, Mikhail Bukinik yearned for his homeland and in 1906 he returned to Moscow. Here he developed a broad musical and social activity: he took an active part in the work of the National Conservatory (at the Society of National Universities), in organizing the Society of Orchestral Musicians, the Society for the Promotion of Chamber Music, etc. 

Occasionally Bukinik appeared on the concert stage. Not possessing particularly bright artistic abilities, he performed mainly in chamber concerts. The name of Mikhail Bukinik is repeatedly found in the chamber programs of the RMS, the Guild of Russian Music Lovers, the Society for the Promotion of Chamber Music, etc. A. B. Goldenweiser names Bukinik among the musicians who performed before L. N. Tolstoy.

In the concert in memory of A. S. Arensky (1906), he played Arensky cello pieces and participated in the performance of a trio (with A. N. Koreshchenko and N. K. Avierino). More than once he played with A. B. Goldenweiser and B. O. Sibor the trios of Tchaikovsky, Arensky, Taneyev. The Taneyev Trio Bukinik also played with the author in concerts dedicated to his work, in 1909 with the violinist A. Ya. Mogilevsky and in 1915 with B. O. Sibor; in the last concert, Bukinik also participated in the performance of the Quintet (author, B. O. Sibor, K. G. Mostras, V. R. Bakaleinikav, M. E. Bukinik) and Taneyev's Canzona (N. G. Raisky, S. I. Taneev, B. O. Sibor, M. E. Bukinik). 

Bukinik also took part in the performance of the trio Kornilov, Gedike, and Pomerantsev together with the composers of these works (the violin parts were performed by K. S. Saradzhev, A. G. Mets, A. Ya. Mogilevsky). 

In 1909, B. O. Sibor and M. E. Bukinik performed as partners of the harpsichordist Wanda Landovskaya, who came on tour to Moscow; this ensemble performed the Beethoven Trio and Rameau's Trio Concerts. Together with B. O. Sibor, M. E. Bukinik organized public chamber soirees. In 1908, for example, at one of the soirees, they performed trios of Beethoven and Rachmaninov with A. B. Goldenweiser, and a Haydn quartet with K. G. Mostras and A. K. Medtner; on the other, Beethoven's Septet, Schumann's quartet, and Brahms' Cello Sonata in E minor were performed (K. N. Igumnov performed the piano part). 

Speaking about the chamber activity of Mikhail Bukinik, we should note his performances of sonatas by Rubinstein, Rachmaninov, Chopin, Brahms, and other composers. Especially often he played sonatas with A. B. Goldenweiser. 

The cellist's repertoire included many pieces by Russian composers - Tchaikovsky, Arensky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Rachmaninov, as well as his own, which he played in various concerts. 

Occasionally, Bukinik also gave independent concerts. For example, in October 1910, in the Small Hall of the Conservatory, he played Chopin's Sonata (with A. B. Goldenweiser), Boellman's Symphonic Variations, Andante cantabile for cello and organ by Bubek (with A. F. Morozov), Intermezzo Op. 43 by Tchaikovsky in his own arrangement, Gliere's "Moment Musical," his own Fantasie for cello and double bass (with V. N. Praskurnin) and others of own pieces: Preludes, Concert Etude (no. 4) for cello solo, and 6 small pieces. The reviewer spoke with restraint about Bukinik's pieces, praised the performance of Chopin's Sonata and Gliere's piece, and wrote that "Mr. Bukinik's playing is thoughtful, expressive, but does not capture the listener." 

Apparently, Bukinik's playing was devoid of virtuosity, showiness, and artistic scope, but it showed a great culture and understanding of the style of the music performed. This can also be judged on the basis of the responses to his participation in the cello competition held in Moscow in 1911 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the RMS. Grigory Prokofiev, for example, wrote that Bukinik "managed to give his performance of the Bach suite real artistic significance." Bukinik's program included Suite No. 5 by Bach, Concerto No. 2 by Davydov, Tchaikovsky/Bukinik Intermezzo, and his own Concert Etude No. 4.

In 1915, M.E. Bukinik was mobilized and returned to music only after the revolution. In 1919, this musician took a professorship at the Kharkiv Conservatory and at the same time worked in the Commissariat for People's Education, being a member of the "troika" that was in charge of musical education in Ukraine. (Among the Kharkiv students of Bukinik in the early 1920s was A. V. Broun, now a professor at the Kharkiv Conservatory.) 

In 1922, by permission of the Ukrainian government, Bukinik left for America with his son, who was heading there to continue his education. Yearning for the homeland, he subsequently strenuously worried about returning. Together with his memories of P. I. Tchaikovsky, Mikhail Bukinik sent a short autobiography from New York to Moscow in the 1930s, in which he wrote: “In America, of course, I live in the interests of my homeland and I vividly experience everything that our great, glorious people are experiencing. 

Among the pedagogical works of Bukinik: "Fingering for scales in 1, 2 and 3 octaves", "Basic exercises in shifting", "Virtuoso exercises in arpeggios", "6 Easy Pieces", "6 Easy Duets." his Four Concert Etudes are of considerable interest in terms of masterfully used virtuoso technique, dedicated by Bukinik to “dear teacher and friend A. E. Glehn," the last of which (F minor) was performed by all participants of the II International Tchaikovsky Competition in 1962. His "Ten Preludes for Cello Solo" are not without musical significance, in which various techniques of cello virtuosity are no less interestingly used. 

Bukinik also wrote a piece titled "Story" for cello solo

A number of Bukinik's transcriptions for cello and piano have been published, including Lensky's aria from "Eugene Onegin", Lullaby from "Mazepa", chorus from "Maid of Orleans” and Intermezzo from the Suite Op. 43 by Tchaikovsky, Rubinstein's Barcarolle, Kalinnikov's Chanson triste, Romance from Napravnik's "Dubravsky," and others. 

Critical Notes Series: Ukrainian Cello Music 

I would like to offer a list of Ukrainian music and Ukraine inspired music that will enrich your repertoire. In some cases, you might already have these works in your repertoire. This list is by no means exhaustive. If you find a work that you like, I will be happy to add it. NB: There are some works on this list that are not originally for cello, but I believe can successfully be played on the cello. In the future, I might consider making a collection of arrangements of these works.

 

Akimenko
Cello Sonata, Op. 37 - Score
Two Pieces, Op. 11- Score

Beethoven
Schöne Minka from 10 National Airs with Variations, Op.107 - ListenScore (originally for flute)
Note: Schöne Minka is the most famous Ukrainian folk song, better known at "The Kozak went beyond the Danube" and "You lied and deceived" (a humorous days-of-the-week song)

Bortkiewicz
Cello Concerto, Op. 20 - Listen
Three Pieces, Op. 25 - Score

Dvořák
Dumky Trio, Op. 90

Gliere
Ballade, Op. 4 - Listen, Score
Cello Concerto - Listen, Score
12 Album Leaves for Cello and Piano, Op. 51 - Listen, Score
8 Duets for Violin and Cello, Op. 39 - Listen, Score
10 Duets for 2 Cellos, Op. 53 - Listen, Score

Glinka
Ruslan and Lyudmila - Score
Note: This opera is set in Kyiv. Besides the overture that your orchestra might program often, I would like to recommend a few arias that will work great on cello from the vocal score: Lyudmila's Cavatina (Act 1), Ruslan's Aria (Act 2), Ratmir's Aria (Act 3)

Ishchenko
Adagietto and Scherzino for Cello and Piano - Listen
Rhapsody - Listen, Score
Cello Concerto No. 2 - Listen
Cello Sonata No. 1 - Listen
Cello Sonata No. 2 - Listen

Hubarenko
Concerto Grosso for Violin, Viola, Cello and Strings - Listen

Hulak-Artemovsky
Zaporozhets za Dunayem (Zaporozhets beyond the Danube) Andriy's aria - ListenScore
Note: Andriy's aria may be played directly from the vocal score.

Kosenko
Sonata - Listen, Score

Laniuk
Etudes - Listen, Score (available from Disentis Sordino Ediziuns Musikalas)
Sonata for Solo Cello - Listen, Score (available from Disentis Sordino Ediziuns Musikalas)

Leonovich
Fantasie-impromptu for Cello Solo - Score
Koheleth for Cello Solo - ListenScore
Rusalka Fantasia for Cello and Piano - Score
Serenade for Cello Solo - ListenScore
Solomon for Cello and Piano- Score
Sonatensatz for Cello and Piano - ListenScore
9 Short Pieces for Cello and Piano - ListenScore
Sonata for Violin and Cello - ListenScore

Leontovych
Shchedryk (aka Carol of the Bells)

Lysenko
Elegy "La Tristesse," Op. 39 for Cello and Piano - Listen, Score

Lyzohub
Sonata in G minor - ListenScore

Modzelewski
Mazur, Op. 9 - Score
Mazur No. 3, Op. 16 - Score
Rhapsodie, Op. 15 - Score
Valse, Op. 10 - Score
Note: Other works are also found on IMSLP. There are no recordings of Modzelewski's works.

Musorgsky
Hopak from Sorochinsky Fair arr. Rachmaninov for Violin and Piano - Listen, Score
Great Gate of Kyiv from Pictures at an Exhibition, arr. for Cello and Piano by Charles Schiff - Listen, Score
Note: Night on the Bald Mountain is also based in Kyiv.

Ornstein
2 Cello Pieces, SO 620
Cello Sonata No.1, SO 612
Cello Sonata No.2, SO 613
Composition No.1 for Cello and Piano, SO 619
Six Preludes for 'Cello and Piano
Note: Complete cello works were recorded by Joshua Gordon - Listen 

Popper
Fantasy on Little Russian (Ukrainian) Songs, Op. 43 - Listen, Score, Additional Information

Prokofiev
Ballade, Op. 15 - Listen
Sinfonia Concertante, Op. 125
Sonata, Op. 119
Sonata, Op. 134 (Unfinished) - Listen
Note: Prokofiev was born in Sontsovka, Ukraine.

Servais
Fille du Regiment Fantasia, Op. 16 - Listen, Score
Souvenir de Czernowitz, Op. 21 - Score
Note: La Fille fantasia was dedicated to the Ukrainian composer Modzelewski. Servais also had a piece called Souvenir de Kiev, but it is now considered lost.

Skoryk
A-RI-A for cello and piano - Score
Cello Concerto - Listen

Shtoharenko
Ballad in Memory of Lysenko - Listen, Score
Cello Sonata - Listen

Stutschewsky
Kaddish - Listen, Score, Additional Information
Note: Stutschewsky was born in Romny, Ukraine, but later moved to Israel.

Szymanowski
Violin Sonata - Listen, Score
Mythes - Listen, Score (arr. for cello and piano)
Note: Szymanowski was born in Kyiv, Ukraine, but later moved to Poland.

Tchaikovsky
Lullaby from Mazeppa arr. Milstein - Listen, Score
Note: Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1 and Symphony No. 2 are largely based on Ukrainian folk songs.

Znosko-Borovsky - Improvisation and Humoresque for Cello Solo - Listen

REVIEW: Cello Bow Force - Bow Training Aid from Shar Violin Shop 

REVIEW: Cello Bow Force - Bow Training Aid from Shar Violin Shop (originally posted on Instagram on June 13, 2019)

I bought this device specifically to review. I have used it for a month now. With all the business I have given to Shar over the last 2 decades, their customer service is less than stellar, but the only reason I come back to them is because of their unbeatable sale prices. I say this to highlight that I BOUGHT the Cello Bow Force to review. They didn't offer it to me free of charge to promote their new product. 

PROS: This device does what they say it does: helps the player keep his/her bow straight. It is easy to put on and remove. I know many teachers are against such devices, but I believe that if used in moderation and stimulating critical thinking in the student, the Cello Bow Force is a great tool. The key is to have the student note the results of the better bow arm usage and the narrower rosin spot on the string. 

CONS: The $34.95 price ticket. The Cello Bow Force is a simple concept made out of cheap materials. I believe $15 dollars would be a great price. As far as the cons for bow technique, there are a few. This device doesn't allow the player to go all the way to the frog (because the arch is too tall and wide) or the tip (because on the bow change the tip goes through the loop). Any kind of retakes are bound to get the hair stuck on the arch. This device works best for small, on-the-string strokes. My baroque bow was a total fail with Cello Bow Force. 

CONCLUSION: This is a great concept and I would recommend it for a teacher to have in his/her arsenal. It should be used specifically to show the student how the bow arm and bow placement change for the better. The rest is up to the student to work out with a mirror. The build and materials don't warrant a $35 price ticket. $15 would be the best price in my opinion. 

I hope this review helps teachers of beginners and intermediate students.

Critical Notes Series: Lalo's Cello Sonata 

Introducing Lalo's Cello Sonata Urtext edition

Édouard Lalo (1823-1892) was a French composer who is best known for his Symphonie Espagnole for violin and orchestra as well as his Cello Concerto. However, he also composed beautiful chamber works such as sonatas for cello and for violin, piano trios, and string quartets that are often overlooked. Like in other composers from Lalo's generation, we can hear an influence of German composers such as Schumann, Mendelssohn, and Wagner, as well as the French-Polish Chopin. We can also hear a distinctly French sound in Lalo's music, the turn of a phrase, the use of harmony. 

Lalo composed his Cello Sonata in 1856, but it was not published until 1875 by the French publishing firm operated by Georges Hartmann. This firm was acquired by Heugel in 1891, and all subsequent reprints were made by Heugel. Lalo dedicated his three-movement Cello sonata to a fellow composer and pianist Anton Rubinstein. The outer movements of the Cello Sonata are in A minor, both in sonata form. The ternary slow movement is in F major with a D minor/major middle section. 

Harmonically unsettled, the first movement begins with a stately introduction in D minor, then moving to C minor, and finally landing on E dominant, preparing the music for the real tonality. Much of the first movement is moody, similar to the composition style and piano writing of Brahms. The second theme is sunny, very likely inspired by Mendelssohn's Song without Words Op. 19, No. 1. Surely, Lalo had Mendelssohn's Cello Sonata No. 2 slow movement in mind when he was composing his own slow movement. Lalo's finale is a stormy tarantella, probably inspired by Chopin's Cello Sonata finale. Alkan's Cello Sonata, composed the same year as Lalo's Sonata, also has a fiery Italian dance for its finale. Perhaps the two composers influenced each other. In turn, Lalo's finale seems to have influenced the first sonata finale by Saint-Saens. There are echoes of Schumann's Fantasie, Op. 17 in bar 41 of Lalo's Sonata finale.

Some cellists prefer to play several passages of Lalo's Sonata up the octave, saying that these passages sound too low. This phenomenon can be observed in a recording by Maurice Gendron, who also tampered with the text of Chopin's Cello Sonata. We believe that Lalo's text should be left as is with the same respect a cellist would have for Beethoven, Chopin, and Rachmaninov's text. 

Our new edition is based on the first edition published by Georges Hartmann in 1875. Differences in slurring, dynamics, and articulation between the score and cello part have been resolved. When the slurring differs in the cello part and the score, the score slurring is placed below and the part slurring above. Editorial marks are placed in brackets or denoted by dashed slurs and hairpins. Missing clef changes have been inserted without comment. The lowest note in bar 118 of the first movement has been changed from a G to an F to match the octave passage. In the finale, bar 120, RH, the seventh note should be a G, not an F#, to match the pattern 2 bars later. 

Lalo's original piano pedaling, including the "con sord." (una corda) has been retained.

Critical Notes Series: Stutschewsky's Kaddish 

I was recently asked to review several editions on Jewish themes. One of the works on the list was Joachim ​Stutschewsky's Kaddish. Stutschewsky was a Ukrainian-Jewish cellist, composer, arranger, and a great promoter of Jewish music in the 20th century. The Kaddish was composed in 1957 in Tel-Aviv and published by OR-TAV Music Publications in 1970. Stutschewsky's Kaddish is a harmonization of the chant sung before the Neilah service on Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement). The same melody was harmonized by Maurice Ravel in 1914. 

The holograph manuscript cover title and copyright information are handwritten in ink by the composer at the end: Tel-Aviv, 30/9/1957. A copy of the holograph is housed at the Martha Blakeney Hodges Collection at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, inscribed to Maurice Eisenberg by the composer, dated 1961

OR-TAV Music Publications has re-engraved their edition on the Finale music notation software. The original 1970 engraving is now out of print. This is the evaluation of Stutschewsky's Kaddish as it is currently available from OR-TAV Music Publication both printed and digital. Special thank you to the Martha Blakeney Hodges Collection for making the original sources available for comparison.

m. 3 - piano LH missing courtesy bass clef for the lower voice (erroneously missing in the manuscript, too)
m. 4 - piano missing diminuendo
m. 6 - piano LH missing a p on beat 2  
m. 6 - cello part note 3 must be a C-natural, not a C#.
m. 8 - piano LH needs a double dot on note 1 and a 16th note on note 2 
m. 8 - cello part has a mf in the manuscript (MS)
m. 10 - piano LH sloppy notation on note 1 


m. 10 in OR-TAV (new edition)


My suggestion

m. 13 - piano LH sloppy notation on note 1 
m. 15 - piano LH sloppy notation on note 1 
m. 15 - first edition cello part has an "a tempo." The MS and first edition score do not have this marking.
m. 18 - piano LH sloppy notation on note 1 
m. 21 - piano LH beat 4 needs a B-flat grace note, not a B-natural 
m. 22 - piano LH missing bass clef on beat 3 
m. 22 - piano LH beat 4 has an unnecessary rest, and it is sloppily placed 
m. 24 - piano LH sloppy notation on note 1 
m. 25 - piano LH beat 3 has a D above the G on the 8th note in the MS 
m. 26 - piano LH has a cresc. hairpin on beats 3-4 in the MS 
m. 27 - staff collision 
m. 27 - cello part does not have a note on beat 5 in the MS
m. 30 - piano RH beat 1 rest is misplaced 
m. 31 - beats 1-2 have a dim. hairpin in the cello and piano parts in the MS 
m. 32 - piano LH sloppy notation on note 1 
m. 34 - cello part only has the top D's in the MS. The first edition has the lower voice, too.
m. 35-37 - piano LH sloppy notation on note 1 
mm. 35-37 - piano part has tenuto marks on beats 3-4 
m. 37 - piano LH sloppy notation on beat 2 
m. 38 - m. 10 - piano LH sloppy notation on beats 1 and 3 
m. 43 - the hairpin must be on the piano LH starting on beat 3. mp dim. missing on beat 2 
m. 48 - first edition cello part has a staccato mark. MS and first edition score do not have this mark.
m. 48 - piano RH sloppy accidental placement on beat 1 

m. 48 - piano LH beat 4 B-flat must be tied to the next measure 
m. 49 - piano LH sloppy notation on note 1 
m. 50 - piano part has a p on beat 2 in the MS 
mm. 51-52 - piano LH missing 8th rest on beat 1 
m. 53 - piano RH missing a tied over F from m.52 
m. 53 - piano LH beat 1 note F is a half note in the MS 
m. 54 - piano RH rests are not in the MS 
m. 55 - piano half notes have accent marks in the MS 
m. 55 - piano LH beat 1 missing a courtesy natural on note F 
m. 56 - piano note 1 in both hands has an accent mark. 
m. 56 - piano part beat 2 has a marcato under note 2 in the MS
m. 56 - piano RH beat 3, note 2 of the triplet, the middle voice has a C# instead of a D in the MS 


m. 56 in the manuscript

m. 57 - cello part has a dim. hairpin instead of the cresc. in the MS

Maurice Eisenberg's Concert Schedule 

Born in Konigsberg of Polish parents, [Maurice] Eisenberg (1900-1972) was brought to the United States by his family when he was two years old. After early training in Baltimore, he played in the Philadelphia Orchestra before becoming principal cellist of the New York Symphony at the age of 18. In 1921, Eisenberg had the opportunity to play for Pablo Casals, who was touring the U.S. This meeting proved to be a turning point in Eisenberg's life because, with Casals' encouragement, he went to Europe the following year to continue his advanced training. Although he studied with Julius Klengel, Hugo Becker, Nadia Boulanger, and Diran Alexanian, Casals was his most important mentor, and they became lifelong friends. 

Eisenberg spent the years between 1926-1939 playing and teaching in Europe. He was well known for his interpretation of the Bach Suites, but his repertoire also included much twentieth-century music. He was a member of the Menuhin Trio and was the founder and artistic director of the London International Violoncello Center. Eisenberg held teaching positions at the Ecole Normale de Musique in Paris (where he succeeded Alexanian as professor of the Casals Class), the Longy School of Music in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and during the last ten years of his life, the International Summer Courses in Cascais, Portugal. His book, Cello Playing of Today, first published in 1957, is now in its fifth edition. At the time of his death in 1972, Eisenberg was Professor of the Cello at the Juilliard School of Music. (Biography from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro)

I would like to present Eisenberg's concert schedule below for anyone who is interested in learning about how a leading cellist and pedagogue helped codify the cello repertoire in the twentieth-century United States. The information is taken from historic newspapers and concert programs from various archives.

12 February 1914 (Baltimore)
Concert sponsored by the Young Men's Hebrew Association at the Old Masonic Temple, accompanied by E. Lester Man.

8 May 1914 (Baltimore)
Played at the Peabody Exhibition Concert with other advanced Conservatory students.

15 December 1914 (Baltimore)
Played at the Madison Street Synagogue as Hanukkah entertainment. Violinist Benjamin Eisenberg also participated. 

28 February 1915 (Baltimore)
Played a recital with pianist Helen Kinsman at the Enoch Pratt Library (Branch No. 12).
Grützmacher - Nocturne [Op. 32, No. 1]
Corelli - Sarabande [Op. 5, No. 8]
Godard - Berceuse from Jocelyn
Martini - Gavotte
Works for piano by Beethoven, Staub, Liszt, and Chopin

28 March 1915 (Baltimore) 
Played a recital with organist Ethel Lustnauer at the Columbia Avenue Methodist Church.
Goltermann - Andante from Cello Concerto No. 3
Works for organ by Borowski, Widor, J.S. Bach, and Hollins

25 April 1915 (Baltimore)
Participated in the sacred concert by the Meyerbeer Singing Society at the Jewish Educational Alliance Building. Violinist Benjamin Eisenberg also participated. 

25 July 1915 (Baltimore)
Played on a recital with organist Harold D. Phillips at the Peabody Conservatory.
Bargiel - Adagio, Op. 38
Goltermann - Andante from Cello Concerto No. 3
Popper - Mazurka [Op. 11, No. 3]
Works for organ by Beethoven, Weber, Tchaikovsky

3 February 1916 (Elkton, Maryland)
Played for the Women's Club of Elkton at the Mechanics' Hall with pianist Esther Cutchin and soprano Mary E. Sharp (sponsored by Peabody).
Grützmacher  - Nocturne [Op. 32, No. 1]
Bruch - Kol Nidrei, Op. 47
Popper - Mazurka [Op. 11, No. 3] 
Works for piano by Chopin, Aliabiev, Arensky, Schumann, and Saint-Saens. Songs by Haydn, Verdi, Cadman, Lehman, Laforge, Sinding, Homer, Horn, and Arne.

4 February 1916 (York, Pennsylvania)
Played for the Women's Club of York at the Country Club of York with pianist Esther Cutchin and soprano Mary E. Sharp (sponsored by Peabody). The proceeds went to war relief in Poland.
Grützmacher - Nocturne [Op. 32, No. 1]
Bruch - Kol Nidrei, Op. 47
Popper - Mazurka [Op. 11, No. 3]
Works for piano by Chopin, Aliabiev, Arensky, Schumann, and Saint-Saens. Songs by Haydn, Verdi, Cadman, Lehman, Laforge, Sinding, Homer, Horn, and Arne.

13 February 1916 (Baltimore)
Played on a recital with organist Anne H. Peterson at Peabody.
Bargiel - Adagio, Op. 38
Massenet - Elegie
Godard - Berceuse from Jocelyn
Popper - Mazurka [Op. 11, No. 3]
Work for organ by Buck, Schumann, Boëllmann, Bartlett, and Smart.

20 November 1916 (Baltimore)
Played Bargiel's Adagio, Op. 38 after a speech by Rabbi Schulman at the Hebrew Benevolent Society.

21 December 1916 (Baltimore)
Played for the Hanukkah presentation for the Sisterhood of the Madison Avenue Temple.

26 May 1917 (Baltimore)
Played at an awards ceremony at Peabody with other advanced students.

22 July 1917 (Baltimore)
Played at an open-air service at Pro-Cathedral. Eisenberg was already in the Baltimore Symphony at this point.

12 April 1921 (Washington DC)
Played a joint recital with pianist Louis Potter at the Mew Masonic Temple Auditorium. Eisenberg was accompanied by Gertrude McRae. Eisenberg was a member of the New York Symphony Orchestra at this point.
Boëllmann - Variations Symphoniques, Op. 23
Bruch - Kol Nidrei, Op. 47
Popper - Gavotte, Op. 23
Chausson/Ronchini - Poème de l'amour et de la mer, Op. 19
Rimsky-Korsakov/Schroeder - Song of India from Sadko
Saint-Saens - Allegro Appassionato, Op. 43
Saint-Saens - Swan from the Carnival of the Animals (encore)

5 February 1922 (New York)
Provided music at the Lafayette Avenue Presbyterian Church at services. He played Andante Moderato from an unspecified piece by Saint-Saens with organist John Hyatt Brewer and Andante Cantabile by Tchaikovsky as part of a string quartet.

18 February 1926 (London debut)
Recital at the Aeolian Hall with pianist Clarence Raybould.
Locatelli/Piatti - Sonata (from Op. 6, Nos. 6 and 12)
Boccherini/Grützmacher - Cello Concerto in B-flat major
Bach - Suite No. 6, BWV 1012
Corelli - Grave [​from Violin Sonata in A major, Op. 5, No. 6?]
Kreisler - Scherzo in the Style of Dittersdorf
Schumann - Abendlied, Op. 85, No. 12
Schubert (Francois) - L'Abeille, Op. 13, No. 9

15 February 1926 (London) 
Recital at the Aeolian Hall with pianist Clarence Raybould.
Bréval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5
Tchaikovsky - Variations on a Rococo Theme, Op. 33
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 1, Op. 38
Bach - Arioso [from Cantata No. 156?]
Fauré/Casals - Après un rêve, Op. 7, No. 1
Granados - Spanish Dance [No. 5]
Klengel - Scherzo, Op. 6

7 December 1926 (London)
Recital at the Aeolian Hall with pianist Clarence Raybould.

15 November 1928 (Berlin)
Played a recital including works by Debussy, Ravel, and Couperin.

15 November 1930 (Berlin)
Recital at the Sing-akademie. Below is an incomplete recital program.
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Davydov - At the Fountain, Op. 20, No. 2
Granados - Spanish Dance [No. 5]

29 November 1930 (London)
Recital

24 May 1931 (London) 
Recital

18 October 1931 (Barcelona)
Recital at the Catalan Music Palace

9 February 1932 (London)
Recital at Wigmore Hall

12 February 1932 (London)
Premiere of Julian (Julius) Krein's Cello Concerto, Op. 25.

22 February 1933 (Bournemouth)
Played Dvořak's Cello Concerto with Bournemouth Municipal Symphony with conductor Sir Dan Godfrey.

12 Feb 1934 (London)
Played Bloch's Schelomo with the London Philharmonic Orchestra with Bloch conducting.

14 February 1934 (Bournemouth)
British premiere of Glazunov's Concerto-Ballata, Op. 108, conducted by Sir Dan Godfrey.

30 January 1935 (Bournemouth)
Played Bloch's Schelomo with the Bournemouth Municipal Symphony with conductor, conducted by Richard Austin

4 February 1935 (London)
Recital at Wigmore Hall, accompanied by George Reeves
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Fauré - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 117
Valentini/Piatti - Sonata in E major (Allettamento Op. 8, No. 10)

24 January 1936 (London) 
Recital at Wigmore Hall, accompanied by George Reeves
Bach - Suite No. 1, BWV 1007
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 1, Op. 38

7 February 1936 (Paris)
French premiere of Arnold Bax's Sonatine at Salle Grevin, accompanied by Lelia Gousseau.

10 October 1936 (Torquay)
Played Dvořak's Cello Concerto with the Torquay Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Ernest Goss.

10 March 1937 (London)
Recital at Wigmore Hall, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn.

8 October 1937 (Belfast)
Recital at the British Music Society of Northern Ireland, accompanied by Harry Isaacs.

11 October 1937 (London) 
Played on a recital at Wigmore Hall with pianist Cecile Simon and violinist Yvonne Astruc.
Simon - Poeme for Violin, Cello, and Piano
Ravel - Sonata for Violin and Cello
Fauré - Violin Sonata No. 1, Op. 13

22 December 1937 (Bergen, New Jersey)
Solo with Bergen County Orchestra.

27 December 1937 (New York)
Debut recital at the Town Hall, accompanied by Ernst Victor Wolff
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99 
Bach - Suite No. 4, BWV 1010
Valentini/Piatti - Sonata in E major (Allettamento Op. 8, No. 10) 
Turina - Le Jeudi Saint a minuit from Sevilla, Op. 2, No. 2
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165 
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1
Weber - unspecified piece

7 January 1938 (Baltimore)
Recital at the Peabody Conservatory.
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Valentini/Piatti - Sonata in E major (Allettamento Op. 8, No. 10)
de Laserna/Cassadó - Tonadilla
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1
Howe - Ballade Fantasque

25 March 1938 (London)
Recital at Wigmore Hall, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn.

18 May 1938 (Paris)
Played the Boccherini/Grützmacher Cello Concerto with the Orchestre de l'Association des Concerts Colonne, conducted by Charles Miller.

24 January 1939 (Danbury, Connecticut)
Recital at the Danbury Music Centre.

30 January 1939 (Scranton, Pennsylvania)
Solo with the Anthracite Philarmonic Orchestra at the Masonic Temple Theatre, conducted by Felix M. Gatz.

14 February 1939 (Montclair, New Jersey)
Played Dvořak's Cello Concerto with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra at the Mount Hebron Junior High School, conducted by Rene Pollain.

26 February 1939 (New York)
Recital at the Town Hall.

4 March 1939 (New York) 
Recital at the Town Hall, accompanied by Harry Kaufman.
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 1, Op. 38
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Bréval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5 
Debussy/Eisenberg - Berceuse Heroique
Cupis de Camargo - Moto Perpetuo (Gavotte) from Violin Sonata Op. 1, No. 2
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Sarasate - Zapateado, Op. 23, No. 2

18 January 1940 (Troy, New York)
Recital at the Vocal Society, accompanied by Harry Kaufman.
Bréval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5
Sarasate - Zapateado, Op. 23, No. 2
Bruch - Kol Nidrei, Op. 47
Haydn/Piatti - Minuet from Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6)
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Bach/Siloti - Adagio from Toccata in C major
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102
Senaille/Salmon - Allegro spiritoso from Violin Sonata, Op. 10, No. 4
Granados/Cassadó - Intermezzo from Goyescas
Handel - Aria from The Messiah
Arensky - Mystic Stars (obbligato)

24 January 1940 (Danbury, Connecticut)
Premiere of Donald Tweedy's Cello Sonata with Harry Kaufman.

26 January 1940 (New York)
Recital at the Town Hall.

29 February 1940 (West Orange, New Jersey)
Recital at the Carteret School for Boys.

17 March 1940 (Austin, Texas)
Recital in the Hogg Auditorium, accompanied by Ruth Penick Pickard.
Cassadó - Toccata in the Style of Frescobaldi
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102
Bach - Suite No. 6, BWV 1012 (Prelude, Sarabande, and Gavottes)
Bréval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5
Fauré/Casals - Après un rêve, Op. 7, No. 1
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Haydn/Piatti - Minuet from Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6)
Granados/Cassadó - Intermezzo from Goyescas
Senaille/Salmon - Allegro spiritoso from Violin Sonata, Op. 10, No. 4

26 March 1940 (Raleigh, North Carolina)
Recital with Joseph Battista at the Memorial Auditorium, sponsored by the Raleigh Woman's Club.

26 November 1940 (Stillwater, Oklahoma)
Solo with the Oklahoma A and M Orchestra, conducted by Frank Hladky. The first half of the concert was with orchestra and the second was with piano accompaniment with James Stephenson.

30 November 1940 (Clinton, South Carolina)
Recital at the Presbyterian College, accompanied by Harry Kaufman.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Breval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5
Bornschein - Appalachian Legend (US Premiere)
Haydn/Piatti - Minuet from Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6)
Sarasate - Zapateado, Op. 23, No. 2
Chopin - Nocturne 
de Laserna/Cassadó - Tonadilla
Granados/Cassadó - Intermezzo from Goyescas 
Davydov - At the Fountain, Op. 20, No. 2

3 December 1940 (Maryville, Tennessee)
Recital with Joseph Battista at the Maryville College)
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Boëllmann - Variations Symphoniques, Op. 23
Chopin - Nocturne
de Laserna/Cassadó - Tonadilla
Granados/Cassadó - Intermezzo from Goyescas 
Davydov - At the Fountain, Op. 20, No. 2
The program also included works for solo piano by Chopin, Liszt, Rachmaninov, Debussy, and Shostakovich.

9 December 1940 (Seattle)
Solo with the Seattle Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Nikolai Sokoloff.

12 December 1940 (Provo, Utah)
Solo with the Brigham Young University Orchestra, conducted by Leroy Robertson.

10 February 1941 (Baltimore)
Recital at Peabody, accompanied by Harry Kaufman.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Boccherini/Grützmacher - Cello Concerto in B-flat major
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102
Bornschein - Appalachian Legend
Fauré/Casals - Après un rêve, Op. 7, No. 1 (encore)
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165 (encore)
Davydov - At the Fountain, Op. 20, No. 2 (encore)

17-18 February 1941 (Montclair, New Jersey) 
Played Haydn's Cello Concerto in D major and Strauss's Don Quixote with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra at the Mount Hebron Junior High School, conducted by Frieder Weissmann, William Primrose on viola

28 March 1941 (Montclair, New Jersey) 
Informal concert at John Kremer's home hosted by the New Jersey Chamber Music Society. Other musicians included Kenneth Deane, John Cataldo, Gerard Glaubitz, and Dorothy Chapman.
Elliot Griffis - String Quartet No. 2, Allegro
Bach - Sarabande from an unspecified Suite.

1 December 1941 (Hartsville, South Carolina)
Recital at the Coker College Auditorium sponsored by Hartville Music Study and the Coker College.

10 February 1942 (Albany, New York)
Played Saint-Saens's Cello Concerto No. 1 with the Albany Symphony Orchestra at Philip Livingston High School, conducted by Rudolph Thomas.

15 February 1942 (Indianapolis)
Joint recital with soprano Jean Tennyson as part of the Wabash Valley Concert Series.

16 February 1942 (Chicago)
Played 2 movements of the Boccherini/Grützmacher Concerto with the WGN Symphony Orchestra for a program "Music that Endures."

26 February 1942 (New York)
Recital at the Town Hall, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Boccherini/Grützmacher - Cello Concerto in B-flat major
Julian Krein - Andante from Cello Concerto, Op. 25
Fauré/Casals - Après un rêve, Op. 7, No. 1
Debussy - unnamed piece

12-13 March 1942 (Los Angeles)
Played the Schumann Cello Concerto, Op. 129 with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, conducted by George Szell.

29 July 1942 (New York)
Played Saint-Saens's Cello Sonata No. 1, Op. 32 over the radio for WABC, collaborated with Isidor Philipp.

29 November 1942 (Millburn, New Jersey)
Recital at the Millburn Arts Center

18 December 1942 (New York)
8th Jubilee concert at the Hunter College

4-5 January 1943 (Chikisha, Oklahoma)
Recital

12 January 1943 (Provo, Utah)
Solo with the Brigham Young University Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leroy Robertson.
Boccherini/Grützmacher - Cello Concerto in B-flat major
Bach - Suite No. 6, BWV 1012

17 January 1943 (Los Angeles) 
Haydn's Concerto in D major with the Hancock Ensemble at the Hancock Auditorium at the University of Southern California.

19 January 1943 (Los Angeles)
Recital at the Hancock Auditorium at the University of Southern California.

24 January 1943 (Stillwater, Oklahoma) 
Recital, accompanied by Mable Murphy

7-8 February 1943 (Red Springs, North Carolina)
Recital at Flora Macdonald College, accompanied by Alexander Wilalta.

April 1943 (Los Angeles) 
Recital with the Hancock Ensemble at the University of Southern California.

9 April 1943 (Waterbury, Connecticut)
Played Beethoven's Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69 for a radio broadcast (WATR)

9 April 1943 (Waterbury, Connecticut) 
Played Brahms's Cello Sonata No. 1, Op. 38 for a radio broadcast (WATR)

2 May 1943 (Los Angeles)  
Recital with violinist Anton Maaskof and pianist John Crown at the University of Southern California.
Brahms - Violin Sonata No. 2, Op. 100
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Brahms - Trio No. 2, Op. 87

6 May 1943 (Los Angeles) 
Recital at the Hancock Auditorium at the University of Southern California.
Schubert - Arpeggione Sonata, D. 821
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102
Haydn/Piatti - Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6)

17 October 1943 (New York)
Recital at the Town Hall, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn
Moor - Prelude, Op. 123
Bach - Suite No. 6, BWV 1012
Bloch - Prayer from Jewish Life
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1
Haydn/Piatti - Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6)
Chopin - Cello Sonata, Op. 65
Unspecified works by Fuleihan and Weber

19 November 1943 (Evansville, Indiana)
Joint recital with Percy Grainger at the Bosse High School Auditorium. Eisenberg was accompanied by Dorothy Wittich.
Cassadó - Toccata in the Style of Frescobaldi
Chopin - Nocturne
Boccherini - Rondo from String Quintet in C major
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009 (Prelude, Sarabande, Bourrees)
Fauré/Casals - Après un rêve, Op. 7, No. 1
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Davydov - At the Fountain, Op. 20, No. 2

30 November 1943 (Newark, New Jersey)
Played Haydn's Cello Concerto in D major with the National Symphony of Washington DC at the Mosque Theatre, conducted by Hans Kindler. The concert also included Shostakovich's Fifth Symphony.

4 January 1944 (Provo, Utah)
Played Haydn's Cello Concerto in D major with the Brigham Young University Orchestra, conducted by Leroy Robertson. The concert also included Bach's Suite No. 3, BWV 1009.

3 March 1944 (Schenectady, New York)
Recital with the Schubert Club of Schenectady at Union College, accompanied by Harrison Potter. (Only cello works of the recital are listed)
Cassadó - Toccata in the Style of Frescobaldi
Boccherini - Adagio and Allegro from Cello Sonata in A major, G. 6
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102
Arensky - Mystic Stars (obbligato)
Fauré/Casals - Après un rêve, Op. 7, No. 1
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165 
Eisenberg - Pizzicato Blues
Davydov - At the Fountain, Op. 20, No. 2

31 March 1944 (Philadelphia)
Recital at the Barclay Ballroom, presented by the Philadelphia Musical Academy, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn.
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 1, Op. 38
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Stravinsky - Suite Italienne
Bloch - Prayer from Jewish Life
Boccherini - Rondo from String Quintet in C major
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Davydov - At the Fountain, Op. 20, No. 2

18 April 1944 (Newark, New Jersey)
Recital at Fuld Hall, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102
Unspecified work by Schubert

21 April 1944 (Los Angeles)   
Recital with the Hancock Ensemble at the University of Southern California.

27 April 1944 (Philadelphia)
Recital presented by the Philadelphia Musical Academy

22 July 1944 (Au Sable Forks, New York)
Recital at the Old Mill Studio, accompanied by Samuel Slussel.

16 October 1944 (Williamsburg)
Recital at the College of William and Mary

22 November 1944 (Philadelphia)
Recital with pianist Joseph Schwarz, violinist Jani Szanto, and violist Erwin Groer.
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 1, Op. 38
Brahms - Piano Trio No. 3, Op. 101
Brahms - Piano Quartet No. 2, Op. 26

29 November 1944 (Montreal)
Recital at the Quebec Provincial Conservatory with Isidor Philipp
Saint-Saens - Cello Sonata No. 1, Op. 32
Philipp - Les Cygnes Noirs
Philipp - Serenade Grotesque
Saint-Saens - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 123

13 December 1944 (Philadelphia) 
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium with pianist Joseph Schwarz, violinist Jani Szanto, and violist Erwin Groer. 
Brahms - Violin Sonata No. 1, Op. 78
Brahms - Piano Trio No. 2, Op. 87
Brahms - Piano Quartet No. 3, Op. 60

17 December 1944  (New York)
Recital at the Brooklyn Museum, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69 
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102
Bach - Suite No. 5, BWV 1011 (Prelude, Courante, Sarabande, Gavottes)
Philipp - Les Cygnes Noirs 
Haydn/Piatti - Minuet from Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6) 
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Senaille/Salmon - Allegro spiritoso from Violin Sonata, Op. 10, No. 4

3 January 1945 (Philadelphia)
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69 
Stravinsky - Suite Italienne
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009 
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102
Haydn/Piatti - Minuet from Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6) 
Granados/Cassadó - Intermezzo from Goyescas
Senaille/Salmon - Allegro spiritoso from Violin Sonata, Op. 10, No. 4
Philipp - Les Cygnes Noirs 
Philipp - Serenade Grotesque

6 January 1945 (New York)
Recital at the Town Hall.

20 January 1945 (Philadelphia)  
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium with pianist Joseph Schwarz, violinist Jani Szanto, and violist Carlton Cooley.  
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99
Brahms - Viola Sonata No. 2, Op. 120, No. 2
Brahms - VIolin Sonata No. 3, Op. 108

2 February 1945 (Newark, New Jersey)
Recital at the Newark Academy

26 February 1945 (Durham, North Carolina) 
Recital at Duke University with clarinetist Allan H. Bone and pianist Narcissus Figueroa.
Brahms - Clarinet Trio, Op. 114

27 February 1945 (Durham, North Carolina)
Recital at Duke University accompanied by Narcissus Figueroa.
Cassadó - Toccata in the Style of Frescobaldi
Haydn/Piatti - Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6)
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009 (Prelude, Sarabande, Bourrees) 
Debussy - Cello Sonata
Stravinsky - Serenata and Aria from Suite Italienne
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Eisenberg - Pizzicato Blue
Davydov - At the Fountain, Op. 20, No. 2

14 March 1945 (Philadelphia)  
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium with pianist Joseph Schwarz, violinist Jani Szanto, violist Trude Gundert, contralto Lyuba Senderowna, and clarinetist Walter Cochrane.
Brahms - Alto Songs, Op. 91
Brahms - Clarinet Sonata No. 1, Op. 120, No. 1
Brahms - Clarinet Trio, Op. 114
Brahms - Violin Sonata No. 2, Op. 100

10 April 1945 (New York) 
Recital at the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences with pianist Erno Balogh and violinist Roman Totenberg.
Beethoven - Violin Sonata No. 9 "Kreutzer," Op. 47
Debussy - Cello Sonata
Schubert - Piano Trio No. 2, Op. 100

17 April 1945 (New York)
Recital at the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences with pianist Erno Balogh and violinist Roman Totenberg.
Mozart - Violin Sonata, K. 454
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Villa-Lobos - Piano Trio No. 3

23 April 1945 (Millburn, New Jersey)
Recital at Millburn High School

24 April 1945 (New York) 
Recital at the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences with pianist Erno Balogh and violinist Roman Totenberg. 
Milhaud - Violin Sonata No. 2 
Chopin - Cello Sonata, Op. 65
Brahms - Piano Trio No. 1, Op. 8

28 April 1945 (Millburn, New Jersey)
Recital at the Millburn High School Auditorium, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn.

11 May 1945 (Philadelphia)   
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium with pianist Joseph Schwarz, violinist Jani Szanto, violinist Albert Busilow, violist Trude Gundert, and clarinetist Walter Cochrane. 
Brahms - Clarinet Quintet, Op. 115
Brahms - Piano Quintet, Op. 34

20 May 1945
Recital at the Brooklyn Museum

27 May 1945 (Boston)
Recital at the Gardner Museum

4 October 1945 (Montreal)
Recital at the YM-YWHA of Montreal, accompanied by John Newmark.
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102
Bréval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5
Bach - Suite No. 2, BWV 1008
Bruch - Kol Nidrei, Op. 47

28 October 1945 (Montclair, New Jersey)  
Played Dvořak's Cello Concerto with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra at the Mount Hebron Junior High School, conducted by Frieder Weissmann.

11 November 1945 (Baltimore)
Played the Boccherini/Grützmacher Cello Concerto with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Reginald Stewart.

14 December 1945 (Baltimore)
Recital at the Peabody Conservatory, accompanied by Arpan Sandor.
Cassadó - Toccata in the Style of Frescobaldi 
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102 
Bach - Suite No. 2, BWV 1008
Stravinsky - Serenata and Aria from Suite Italienne
Duke - Dialogue (world premiere)
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1
Senaille/Salmon - Allegro spiritoso from Violin Sonata, Op. 10, No. 4

17 December 1945 (Scranton, Pennsylvania)
Played Dvořak's Cello Concerto with Scranton Philharmonic Orchestra (subbed for Joseph Schuster) at the Masonic Temple, conducted by Frieder Weissmann.

11 January 1946 (Philadelphia)
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium with pianist Bruno Eisner, violinists Jeno Szanto and Albert Brusilow, and violist Trude Gundert.
Schubert - Piano Trio No. 1, Op. 99
Schubert - Duo in A major
Schubert - String Quartet "Death and the Maiden"

17 January 1946 (Philadelphia) 
Recital at the Barclay Ballroom, presented by the Philadelphia Musical Academy.
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99
Bach - Suite No. 2, BWV 1008
Cassadó - Toccata in the Style of Frescobaldi  
Bréval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5
Duke - Dialogue (world premiere) 
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Benjamin - Jamaican Rumba
Alexander Krein - Jewish Melodie, Op. 43

26 January 1946 (New York)
Recital at the Town Hall.

29 January 1946 (New York)
Recital at the Brooklyn Academy of Music with violinist Roman Totenberg and pianist Arpad Sandor.
Schubert - Piano Trio No. 1 in B-flat major
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99
Dvořak - Dumky Trio, Op. 90

3 March 1946 (Torquay) 
Played Dvořak's Cello Concerto with the Torquay Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Ernest Goss.

10 March 1946 (London)
Played the Boccherini/Grützmacher Concerto with the London Symphony Orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall, conducted by Sir Malcolm Sargent.

12 April 1946 (Philadelphia) 
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium with pianist Bruno Eisner, violinists Jeno Szanto and Albert Brusilow, and violist Trude Gundert. 
Schubert - String Quartet in E-flat major
Schubert - String Quartet in G major
Schubert - Fantasie in A for violin and piano 

3 May 1946 (Philadelphia)  
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium with pianist Bruno Eisner, violinists Jeno Szanto and Albert Brusilow, violist Trude Gundert, cellist JaneSaunders, and bassist Roger Scott.
Schubert - Piano Quintet "Trout"
Schubert - String Quintet

24 October 1946 (Montreal) 
Recital at the YMHA of Montreal accompanied by John Newmark
Bach - Gamba Sonata No. 3, BWV 1029
Valentini/Piatti - Sonata in E major (Allettamento Op. 8, No. 10)
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99
Bloch - Prayer from Jewish Life
Ibert/Marechal - Le petit âne blanc from Histoires
Turina - Le Jeudi Saint a minuit from Sevilla, Op. 2, No. 2
Benjamin - Jamaican Rumba

27 October 1946 (New York)
Joint recital with soprano Ann Roselle at the Brooklyn Museum.

30 October 1946 (Newark, New Jersey) 
Recital at Fuld Hall with Bruno Eisner at the piano.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Debussy - Cello Sonata
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99

14-15 November 1946 (Lincoln, Nebraska)
Recital at the Doane College, accompanied by Allan Sly.
Cassadó - Toccata in the Style of Frescobaldi
Valentini/Piatti - Sonata in E major (Allettamento Op. 8, No. 10)
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102 
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009 
Eisenberg - Pizzicato Blues
Other unspecified works

7 November 1946 (Stillwater, Oklahoma)   
Recital at the Oklahoma A and M College, accompanied by Allan Sly.

18 November 1946 (Nashville)
Recital at the Ward Balmont College
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Eisenberg - Pizzicato Blues
Other unspecified works

7 January 1947 (Philadelphia)   
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium, accompanied by Bruno Eisner
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Debussy - Cello Sonata
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99

12 January 1947 (Hackettstown, New Jersey) 
Recital at the Centenary Junior College.

5 February 1947
Premiered Bax's Cello Concerto with the BBC Symphony Orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall, conducted by Sit Adrian Boult.

1 March 1947 (London)
Recital for the radio, accompanied by Harriet Cohen.

24 March 1947 (Ottawa)
Recital at the Technical School Hall, accompanied by John Newmark.
Cassadó - Toccata in the Style of Frescobaldi 
Valentini/Piatti - Sonata in E major (Allettamento Op. 8, No. 10)
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102  
Debussy - Cello Sonata
Ibert/Marechal - Le petit âne blanc from Histoires
Turina - Le Jeudi Saint a minuit from Sevilla, Op. 2, No. 2
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Davydov - At the Fountain, Op. 20, No. 2

30 March 1947 (New York)
Joint recital with Vladimir Padwa at the Brooklyn Museum. Eisenberg was accompanied by Otto Herz.
Cassadó - Toccata in the Style of Frescobaldi 
Schumann - 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102 (3 pieces performed)
Bach/Siloti - Komm, susser Tod
Turina - Le Jeudi Saint a minuit from Sevilla, Op. 2, No. 2
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1

26 May 1947 (Bloomfield, New Jersey)
Recital at the Bloomfield High School, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn.

1 February 1948 (Millburn, New Jersey)
Recital at the Milburn High School

19 February 1948 (Philadelphia)  
Recital at the Ethical Society Auditorium, accompanied by Arpad Sandor.
Elgar - Cello Concerto, Op. 85
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Fauré/Casals - Après un rêve, Op. 7, No. 1
Turina - Le Jeudi Saint a minuit from Sevilla, Op. 2, No. 2
Haydn/Piatti - Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6)
Ibert/Marechal - Le petit âne blanc from Histoires
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1
Prokofiev - Gavotte from the Classical Symphony, Op. 25
Unspecified piece by Handel

2 May 1948 (Boston)
Recital at the Gardner Museum

24 October 1948 (Hackettstown, New Jersey)
Recital at the Centenary Junior College, accompanied by Erich-Itor Kahn. The recital included Brahms and pieces by modern and classical composers.

19 January 1949 (Orange, New Jersey)
Recital at the Orange High School
Turina - Le Jeudi Saint a minuit from Sevilla, Op. 2, No. 2
Sarasate - Zapateado, Op. 23, No. 2
Other unspecified pieces.

20 October 1949 (Orono, Maine)
Recital at the University of Maine, accompanied by David Bacon.
Pieces by Bach, Boccherini, Schumann, Stravinsky, Sarasate.

6 November 1949 (Montreal)
Played Haydn's Cello Concerto in D major with the CBC The Little Symphonies Orchestra, conducted by Roland Leduc.

9 November 1949 (Montreal)
Guest artist at McGill University
Boccherini - String Quintet in C major
Schubert - String Quintet in C major

15 November 1949 (Montclair, New Jersey)
Played Schumann's Cello Concerto with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Samuel Antek.

5 February 1950 (Washington DC)
Recital at the Phillips Gallery.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Haydn/Piatti - Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6)
Bach - Suite No. 6, BWV 1012 (Prelude, Sarabande, and Gavottes)
Stravinsky - Serenata and Aria from Suite Italienne
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Prokofiev - Gavotte from the Classical Symphony, Op. 25
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1

16 March 1950 (Birmingham, England)
Played Haydn's Cello Concerto in D major with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, conducted by George Weldon.

15 July 1950 (Amagansett, New York)
Recital with Tsuya Matsuki

24 October 1950 (Montreal) 
Plays a Suite on an all-Bach concert at McGill University.

26 October 1950 (Montreal)
Recital at the YH-YWMA concert series at the Snowdon Auditorium, accompanied by John Newmark.
Bach - Suite No. 6, BWV 1012
Debussy - Cello Sonata
Beethoven - 7 Variations on a theme from Mozart's Magic Flute
Bloch - Prayer from Jewish Life
Haydn/Piatti - Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6)
Granados/Cassadó - Intermezzo from Goyescas
Sarasate - Zapateado, Op. 23, No. 2
Prokofiev - Gavotte from the Classical Symphony, Op. 25

12 November 1950 (Philadelphia)
All-Bach recital at the Philadelphia Musical Academy with Agi Jambor.

14 November 1950 (New York)
Recital at the Town Hall.

24 November 1950 (Montreal)
Plays on a recital at McGill University with violinist Alexander Brott and violist Lucien Robert.
Dohnanyi - Serenade, Op. 8
Bach - Suite No. 2, BWV 1008
Brahms - String Quartet No. 2, Op. 51

3 February 1950 (Washington DC) 
Recital at the Phillips Gallery with Vladimir Padwa at the piano.
Bach/Kodaly - 3 Chorale Preludes
Bach/Busoni - Toccata in C major (piano alone)
Bach - Suite No. 2, BWV 1008
Bach - Gamba Sonata No. 2, BWV 1027

5 December 1950 (New York) 
Recital at the Town Hall.

5 January 1951 (Philadelphia) 
All-Bach recital at the Philadelphia Musical Academy with Agi Jambor.

9 January 1951 (New York) 
Recital at the Town Hall.

6 March 1951 (Athens, Ohio)
Recital at the Ohio University, accompanied by Adolph Weiser.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Debussy - Cello Sonata
Stravinsky - Serenata and Aria from Suite Italienne
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Sarasate - Zapateado, Op. 23, No. 2

8 March 1951 (Zanesville, Ohio)
Recital at the Muskingum College

15 March 1951 (Newark, New Jersey)
Played Dvořak's Cello Concerto with the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Mosque Theatre, conducted by Eugene Ormandy.

9 June 1951 (Poughkeepsie, New York)
Recital at the Hudson Valley Chamber Music
Boccherini/Grützmacher - Cello Concerto in B-flat major
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165
Granados/Cassadó - Intermezzo from Goyescas 
Prokofiev - Gavotte from the Classical Symphony

27 November 1951 (Lawrence, Kansas)
Recital at the University of Kansas, accompanied by Marian Jersild.

21 January 1952 (Montreal) 
All-Bach recital with pianist John Newmark and flutist Mario Duschenes at the Gesu Theatre. The recital included an unspecified cello suite, gamba sonata, and flute sonata.

March 1952 (Belfast)
Recital in Belfast, Ireland.

24 and 27 March, and 1 April 1952 (London)
Played the complete Bach Suites and Gamba Sonatas over the course of three concerts at Wigmore Hall, accompanied by Ivor Keys on the Sonatas.

24 April 1952 (Newark, New Jersey)
Joint recital with Mieczyslaw Horszowski at the Griffith Auditorium.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Valentini/Piatti - Sonata in E major (Allettamento Op. 8, No. 10)
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99

24 May 1952 (Newark, New Jersey) 
Played the Boccherini/Grützmacher Concerto with a string ensemble at the Griffith Auditorium in honor of Mrs. Parker O. Griffith.

9 November 1952
Recital at the Longy School of Music, accompanied by David Bacon on the piano and Melville Smith on the harpsichord.
Bach - Gamba Sonata No. 1, BWV 1027
Bach - Suite No. 5, BWV 1011
Martinů - Cello Sonata No. 2 (1941)
Bréval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5

30 November 1952 (Cambridge, Massachusetts)
All-Bach recital at Harvard University
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Bach - Suite No. 4, BWV 1010
Bach - Suite No. 5, BWV 1011

10 December 1952 (New York)
All-Bach recital at the Lexington Ave. YM-YWHA

25 January 1953 (Washington DC) 
Recital at the Phillips Gallery.
Bach - Suite No. 3, 1009
Stravinsky - Serenata and Aria from Suite Italienne

1 February 1953 (Boston)
Played a recital called "Bach the Court Musician" at the Museum of Fine Arts, accompanied by David Bacon on harpsichord and Virginia Bacon on cello. The program consisted of Bach's 3 Gamba Sonatas, BWV 1027-1029.

10 April 1953 (Belfast)
Played Dvorak's Cello Concerto and Tchaikovsky's Rococo Variations with the City of Belfast Orchestra, conducted by Denis Mulgan in Wellington Hall.

1 November 1953 (Princeton, New Jersey) 
Recital at Princeton University playing Bach's Cello Suites Nos. 1, 2, and 6. 

22 November 1953 (Princeton, New Jersey)  
Recital at Princeton University playing Bach's Cello Suites Nos. 3, 4, and 5.

October 1954 (Birmingham, England)
Recital at the Barber Institute (Birmingham University) with Ivor Keys. Included music by Bach, Beethoven, and Fauré.

11 October 1954 (London)
Recital at Wigmore Hall with Ivor Keys.

12 December 1954 (Cambridge, Massachusetts)
Recital at the Longy School, accompanied by David Bacon.
Bréval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5
Fauré - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 117
Stravinsky - Excerpts from Suite Italienne
Hindemith - Capriccio, Op. 8, No. 1
Bach - Unspecified Suite

12 April 1955 (Boston)
Played Elgar's Cello Concerto with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Charles Munch.

10 May 1955 (Athens, Ohio)
Recital at the Ohio University with Erno Dohnanyi.
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 1, Op. 38
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 4, Op. 102, No. 1
Dohnanyi - Cello Sonata, Op. 8

16 October 1955 (London)
Recital at Wigmore Hall with Ivor Keys.

7-8 November 1955 (Montclair, New Jersey)
Played Brahms's Double Concerto with Maurice Wilk and the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Samuel Antek.

11 December 1955 (San Antonio, Texas)
Played Bloch's Schelomo with the San Antonio Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Victor Alessandro.

1 March 1956 (Bournemouth, England)
Played Elgar's Cello Concerto with the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Charles Groves.

19 October 1956 (London)
Recital at St.Mark's Church Hamilton Terrace (St. John's Wood) with Ivor Keys.

6 November 1956
Recital at the Oklahoma College for Women
Granados/Cassadó - Intermezzo from Goyescas
de Laserna/Cassadó - Tonadilla
Prokofiev - Gavotte from the Classical Symphony
Bach - Unspecified suite
Unspecified works by Schumann and Boccherini

17 January 1957 (Oswego, New York) 
Recital at SUNY Oswego 

7 April 1957 (London)  
Recital at Wigmore Hall with Ivor Keys. Complete Beethoven works for cello and piano.

16 March 1958 (Dekalb, Illinois)
Played Lalo's Cello Concerto with the Rockford Symphony Orchestra at the Jefferson J.H.S Auditorium, conducted by Arthur Zack.

19 March 1958 (Stillwater, Oklahoma)
Recital at the Oklahoma State University, accompanied by Marie Friedlander.
Lully/Bazelaire - Passacaille
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Boulanger - Piece No. 3 in C-sharp minor
Fauré - Après un rêve, Op. 7, No. 1
Schumann - Adagio and Allegro, Op. 70
Prokofiev - Gavotte from the Classical Symphony, Op. 25
Albéniz/Eisenberg - Malagueña from España, Op. 165

4 October 1958 (Canterbury, England)
Recital at the King's School, accompanied by Alan Jellen.
Lully/Bazelaire - Passacaille
Beethoven - 12 Variations on a theme from Mozart's Magic Flute, Op. 66
Bach - Suite No. 5, BWV 1011 (Prelude, Sarabande, Gigue)
Bax - Sonatine
Chopin - Adagio  [Largo from the Cello Sonata?]
Prokofiev - Gavotte from the Classical Symphony, Op. 25
Bréval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5

19 October 1958 (Dartington Hall, England)
Recital at the Dartington Hall Centre, accompanied by Alan Jellen.
Lully/Bazelaire - Passacaille  
Beethoven - 12 Variations on a theme from Mozart's Magic Flute, Op. 66 
Bach - Suite No. 5, BWV 1011 
Martinů - Cello Sonata No. 2 (1941) 
Bréval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5

22 October 1958 (London) 
Recital at Wigmore Hall with Ivor Keys.
Lully/Bazelaire - Passacaille 
Beethoven - 12 Variations on a theme from Mozart's Magic Flute, Op. 66
Bach - Suite No. 5, BWV 1011
Martinů - Cello Sonata No. 2 (1941)
Bréval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5

11 April 1959 (London)
Lecture and recital at the London Cello Club. The lecture was followed by a performance of Bach's Suite No. 5.

May 1959 (Montclair, New Jersey)
Played Bach/Siloti Air with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Jennings Butterfield. Eisenberg also played the Sarabande from Bach's Suite No. 5.

11 May 1959 (Cambridge, Massachusetts)
Concert at the Longy School.
Gregory Tucker - Divertimento for Piano and Strings (world premiere)
Boccherini/Grützmacher - Cello Concerto in B-flat major
Villa-Lobos - Bachianas Brasileiras No. 1 (Eisenberg conducted)

8 October 1959 (London)
Solo with the Capriol Orchestra, conducted by Roy Budden.
Handel - Cello Concerto in G minor (arr. from the Oboe Concerto)
Bach - Suite No. 6, BWV 1012
Boccherini/Grützmacher - Cello Concerto in B-flat major

6 December 1959 (Wellesley, Massachusetts)
Recital at the Wellesley College, accompanied by Gregory Tucker.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 5, No. 2
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 4, Op. 102, No. 1
Beethoven - 12 Variations on a theme from Mozart's Magic Flute, Op. 66
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 69

7 December 1959 (Wellesley, Massachusetts) 
Recital at the Wellesley College, accompanied by Gregory Tucker. 
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 1, Op. 5, No. 1
Beethoven - 7 Variations on a theme from Mozart's Magic Flute
Beethoven - 12 Variations on a theme from Handel's Judas Maccabeus
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 5, Op. 102, No. 2

12 March 1962 (London)  
Recital at Wigmore Hall with Ivor Keys.

3 May 1962 (Boston)
Recital at the Lowell House

7 May 1962 (Cambridge, Massachusetts)
Concert at the Longy School.
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99 (with pianist David Bacon)
Mozart - Oboe Quartet, K. 370
Schumann - Andante and Variations, Op. 46
Piston - Piano Quintet

13 November 1962 (Austin, Texas)
Recital at the University of Texas at Austin, accompanied by Dolores Jerde Keahey.
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 5, Op. 102, No. 2
Martinů - Cello Sonata No. 2 (1941)
Bach - Suite No. 3, BWV 1009
Haydn/Piatti - Sonata in C major (after Duo, Hob.VI:6)

13 January 1963 (Cambridge, Massachusetts)
Recital at the Longy School, accompanied by Ivor Keys.
Martinů - Cello Sonata No. 2 (1941)
Bréval/Alexanian - Cello Sonata in G major, Op. 12, No. 5
Brahms - Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 99
Unspecified Bach suite

15 January 1963 (New York)
Recital at the Town Hall.

14 December 1963 (Mexico City)
Played Dvorak's Cello Concerto and Maria Teresa Prieto's Adagio and Fugue with the Mexican National Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Abel Eisenberg (no relation). 

11 January 1964 (Montclair, New Jersey)
Played Elgar's Cello Concerto with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Kenneth Schermerhorn.

11 March 1964 (London)   
Recital at Wigmore Hall with Ivor Keys.

24 October 1965 (Montclair, New Jersey) 
Played Fauré's Elegie with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Kenneth Schermerhorn.

Critical Notes Series: Henle Curriculum 

Every other school year I teach a 400-level class called "String Literature Survey" at Bob Jones University in Greenville, SC. This class is designed for string majors to learn about sonatas from 1700 to 2000, starting with Corelli's violin sonatas and ending with my Sonatensatz. We cover a large range of topics including style, technique, form, the collaboration between composer and artist, etc. My main goal is for the students to be well-versed in the sonata genre. The choice of teaching exclusively sonatas was personal. We also talk about concertos and concert pieces, but not in-depth. Covering all genres would be surfacy and overwhelming.

Building a curriculum for this class was not easy. The literature about strings strongly favors violin; however, I have students who also play viola and cello. After exploring different options, I settled on the core curriculum to include Melvin Berger's Guide to Sonatas, Abram Loft's Violin and Keyboard, and a set of Henle prefaces. Together, these texts create a balanced view of the pieces that we study.

Berger's text is a good overview of the sonatas in general. Some of the information is outdated, but I believe this text serves as a good primer. As I teach the students to think critically, we learn to point out outdated or erroneous information. Berger also does not Saint-Saens and some other composers we talk about.

Loft's 2-volume set takes a deep look at works for violin. I also like Loft's writing style, something that works well as a starting point for my students as they learn to write about music. However, Loft is antagonistic and unhelpful with works by Saint-Saens, D'indy, and others; this is very disappointing since his overview of most standard violin works is superb. Loft does not mention Poulenc's violin sonata.

Henle prefaces vary in writing style and information from editor to editor, but they all contain information useful for research, which prepares my students for master's and doctoral programs. Henle's text also needs to be balanced out because, for example, Brahms's Cello Sonata, Op. 38 does not mention a connection to Bach's The Art of the Fugue when there is a clear connection. This is where Berger's text is helpful. Nevertheless, the Henle text is generally well-researched. Another perk of using Henle prefaces is that students make a connection between the scholarship and the edition, which builds discernment.

When we come to 20th-century sonatas, we use texts from biographies. For example, we read Barbara Heyman's Barber biography about the cello sonata. Both the cello sonata and cello concerto are covered in great depth. For Poulenc, we read Wilfrid Mellers's Poulenc biography, which covers his sonatas. For Shostakovich, we read Elizabeth Wilson's Shostakovich biography. For some composers like John Corigliano and William Bolcom, we read the personal writings of those composers.

We finish the class with a look at my Sonatensatz that I wrote in 2003 and revised several times for various performances.

Students choose a sonata that we didn't cover in class for their term papers. The choices in this regard are limitless. Typically, students end up choosing a sonata for their senior recital as a result of taking this class.

David Popper's Concert Schedule 1860-68 

My sources are Stephen De'ak's David Popper and Clytus Gottwald's Max Seifriz: Beiträge zu Lebenslauf und Werk. Other sources are linked. Additional information is provided in brackets.

 

29 March 1860 (Royal Estates Theatre in Prague, Prague Conservatory Orchestra under Kittl)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 6 "Pastorale," Op. 68
Ambros: Overture to drama Der Wunderthätige Magus
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 5 "Emperor," Op. 73 (Bülow)
Servais: Souvenir de St Petersburg, Op. 15 (Popper)
Hérold: aria "Jours de mon enfance" from act 1 of opera Le pré aux clercs (Klettnerová, Řebíček on obbligato violin)
Léonard: Fantaisie pastorale "Les échos," Op.22 (Hřímalý)
Chopin: Nocturne in D-flat major, Op.27/2 (Bülow)
Wagner/Liszt: March from Tannhäuser (Bülow)
Liszt: Rigoletto, paraphrase de concert (Bülow)

 

18 December 1861 (Vienna)

Beethoven: Piano Trio, Op. 70, No. 2
Goltermann: Cello Concerto No. 1 in A minor, Op. 14

 

7 March 1862 (Prague Girls Reformatory Institute)

Beethoven: Archduke Trio, Op. 97

 

9 March 1862 (Prague, Konvikt)

Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 2, Op. 58 (Popper, Čermáková pf)
Goltermann: Concerto [No. 1] (Popper, Slanský ? pf)
Chopin: Scherzo No. 2, Op. 31 (Čermáková pf)
Servais: Fantaisie on Slavonic/Bohemian Folk Songs (Popper, Slanský ? pf)
Schubert: Der Neugierige (Bachmann)
Schubert: Auf dem Wasser zu Singen (Ehrenbergů)
Schumann: Waldesgespräch (Ehrenbergů)
Schubert: selection from Die schöne Müllerin (Bachmann)

 

12 March 1862 (Prague, Žofín Island, with Estates Theatre orchestra)

Slavík: unspecified Overture (‘first performance’) 
Procházka: chorus Naše vlast (solo v, Hardtmuth, Hlahol male voice singing society)
Popper: Adagio and Rondo [from Cello Concerto No. 2, Op. 24] (Popper)
Jelen: Tam v dáli!: (Josefa Schmidt-Procházková)
Lachner: chorus Na Vltavě (solo T, solo v, TTBB chorus; Hlahol male voice singing society, dir. J.L. Lukes) 
Veit: Concert Overture, Op. 17, Nocí k světlu
Škroup: unsp. aria from opera Oldřich a Božena (Oldřich and Božena) (Ehrenbergů)
Chopin: 2nd and 3rd movs. from unsp. Concerto (Svobodová)
2 Czech Folk Songs: ([J.L.] Lukes)
Vojáček: chorus Před nepřítelem (Before the foe) (TTBB chorus; Hlahol singing society)

 

8 May 1862 (Prague, New Town Theatre [Novoměstské divadlo], with Estates Theatre orchestra under Jahn)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 7, Op. 92
Winter: Aria from opera Das unterbrochene Opferfest (Eilers)
Donizetti: aria of Antonina from act 1 of opera Belisario (Bělská)
Pivoda: Slovanská píseň (Bělská, Pivoda)
Popper: Concertstück [probably a movement of Concerto No. 2] (Popper)
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 3, Op. 37, mvt. I (Pišová)

 

9 (or 2) May 1862 (Leipzig Conservatory)

Schumann: Cello Concerto, Op. 129 (Popper)
Goltermann: Cello Concerto [No. 1] (Popper)
 

9 November 1862 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Overture Coriolan 
Chopin: Nocturne in B major and Polonaise in A-flat major (Bransart) 
David Popper: Cello Concerto in E minor [Op. 24] (Popper) 
Liszt: Tasso 
Schubert: Symphony in C major "Great"

 

27 November 1862 (Löwenberg)

Wagner: Vorspiel from Tristan und Isolde 
Rossini: Aria from I Tancredi (Albertine Meyer) 
Beethoven: Cello Sonata in A major, Op. 69 (Popper, Bronsart) 
Bellini: Aria from Montechi e Capuleti (Meyer) 
Berlioz: Overture to Benvenuto Cellini 
Liszt: Orpheus 
Schubert: Der Wanderer (Meyer) 
Beethoven: Symphony No. 5, Op. 67

 

26 December 1862 (Löwenberg)

Wagner: Eine Faust-Ouverture 
Beethoven: Horn Sonata in F major, Op. 17 (Bronsart. Klotz) 
[Seifriz]/Popper: Fantasie über Lieder des Fürsten [Op. 1] (Popper) 
Chopin: Nocturne in F# major (Bronsart) 
Liszt: Valse impromptu (Bronsart) 
Liszt: Les Preludes 
Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 3 "Scottish," Op. 56

 

28 January 1863 (Löwenberg)

Cherubini: Overture to Der Wasserträger 
Beethoven: Piano Trio, "Archduke," Op. 97 (Bronsart. Seifriz. Popper) 
Schumann: Beim Abschied zu singen op. 84 
Beethoven: Meerestille und glückliche Fahrt op. 112 
Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 4 "Italian," Op. 90
Beethoven: Overture to Egmont

 

29 January 1863 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 6 "Pastorale," Op. 68
Beethoven: Aria from Fidelio (Louise Köster, Berlin) 
Mendelssohn: Overture to Athalia 
Weber: Szene and Arie from Oberon (Köster) 
[Seifriz]/Popper: Fantasie über Lieder des Fürsten [Op. 1] (Popper) 
Taubert: Zwei Lieder (welche?) (Köster) 
Weber: Overture from Freischütz

 

26 February 1863 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Leonoren-Ouverture No. 1 
Beethoven: Sonata appassionata Op. 57 (Bronsart) 
Servais: Fantaisie characteristique (Popper) 
Glinka: Kamarinskaya 
Berlioz: Overture to Le Corsaire 
Schumann: Symphony No. 4, Op. 120

 

26 March 1863 (Löwenberg)

Brahms: Serenade 
Spontini: Overture to Ferdinand Cortez 
Beethoven: Sonata Op. 31, No. 2 (Bronsart) 
Batta: Elegie (Popper) 
Schubert: Ave Maria (Popper) 
Glinka: Capriccio brillant sur jota Aragonesa 
Rossini: Overture to Guillaume Tell

 

7 April 1863 (Löwenberg)

Taubert: Overture to Der Sturm 
Mozart: Arie from Figaros Hochzeit (Mampe-Babnigg) 
Popper: Konzertstück for Violin und Violoncello (Stern. Popper) 
Spontini: Szene und Arie aus Vestalin (Mampe-Babnigg) 
Chopin: Nocturne in D minor (Bronsart) 
Liszt: Hungarian Rhapsody No. 6 (Bronsart) 
Moritz Strakosch: Patti-Walzer (Mampe-Babnigg) 
Berlioz: Overture to Les Francs-juges 
Beethoven: Symphony No. 4, Op. 60

 

17 June 1863 (Prague, Žofín Island)

Popper played an unspecified solo work with Orchestra

 

12 November 1863 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 1, Op. 21 
Spohr: Overture to Jessonda 
Popper: Fantasie über Themen aus den Hugenotten (Popper) 
Schumann: Nachtlied for Choir and Orchestra
Schumann: Zigeunerleben (orch. Seifriz)
Wagner: Overture to Rienzi

 

18 December 1863 (Löwenberg)

Méhul: Overture to La chasse du jeune Henri 
Servais: Souvenir de Petersbourg, Op. 15 (Popper) 
Spontini: Overture to Olympia 
Berlioz: Romeo et juliette, Parts 2 and 3
Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique, mvt. II 
Rossini: Overture to Guillaume Tell

 

24 January 1864 (in Berlin) (Löwenberg)

Volkmann: Cello Concerto, Op. 33 (Popper. Bülow)
Servais: Morceau de concert (Popper. Bülow)

 

4 March 1864 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 7, Op. 92
Schumann: Overture to Manfred, Op. 115 
Volkmann: Cello Concerto [Op. 33] (Popper) 
Schubert/Liszt: Reitermarsch 
Spontini: Overture to Ferdinand Cortez

 

14 April 1864 (Löwenberg)

Liszt: Tasso 
Donizetti: Aria from Lucia di Lammermoor (Weiss) 
Fürst Constantin: Ich bleib bei dir. Lied for Tenor and Horn (Weiss. Klotz) 
[Volkmann: Cello Concerto, Op. 33 (Popper)] (listed as a different work in the quotation)
Fürst Constantin: Sehnsucht (Weiss. Klotz) 
Fürst Constantin: Wo poch ich an (Weiss. Popper) 
Weber: Overture to  Oberon 
Beethoven: Symphony No. 7, Op. 92

 

June 1864 (in Breslau)

Popper: Romanesca [unpublished]
Schumann: Phantasiestucke [Op. 73]
Schumann: Trio in D minor, Op. 63 (with Silberschmidt and Damrosch)

 

24 August 1864 (Karlsruhe in honor of Volkmann's 49th birthday)

Volkmann: Piano Trio, Op. 5 (Rötscher, Reményi, Popper)
Volkmann: Cello Concerto, Op. 33 (Popper, Seifriz replaced Bülow due to illness) 

 

13 October 1864 (Leipzig)

Mozart/Popper: Larghetto for Clarinet Quintet, K. 581 (Popper)
Pergolesi: Air [Nina] (Popper) 
Volkmann: Cello Concerto, Op. 33 (Popper) 

 

27 November 1864 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 4, Op. 60
Mendelssohn: Overture "Die Hebriden"
Rubinstein: Cello Concerto, Op. 65 (Popper)
Liszt: Mephisto-Walzer for Orchestra
Rossini: Overture to Guillaume Tell

 

4 December 1864 (Prague)

Bach: Sarabande [G major Suite] (Popper) 
Rubinstein: Sonata No. 1 in D major, Op. 18 (Popper)
Pergolesi: Air [Nina] (Popper) 
Servais: Morceau de concert (Popper)
Popper: [Scenes d'un bal masque, Op. 3]

 

December 1864 (Magdeburg)

Volkmann: Cello Concerto, Op. 33 (Popper)

 

December 1864 (Prague, Cacilienverein)

No program was given. Probably a mix of the above works.

 

26 December 1864 (Löwenberg)

Gade: Overture Nachklänge an Ossian 
Mozart: Aria from Titus (Lorch) 
Bach: Sarabande [G major Suite] (Popper) 
Popper: Scenes d'un bal masque [Op. 3] (Popper) 
Beethoven: Zwei schottische Lieder (Lorch. Popper. ?) 
Beethoven: Overture to König Stephan op. 117 
Schubert: Symphony No. 7

 

5 February 1865 (Löwenberg)

Raff: Suite in C major, Op. 101 
Volkmann: Cello Concerto, Op. 33 (Popper) 
Bülow: Des Sängers Fluch 
Berlioz: Romeo et Juliette, Part 3 and 2

 

19 March 1865 (Löwenberg)

Liszt: Tasso   
Volkmann: Cello Concerto, Op. 33 (Popper) 
Schumann: Overture to Manfred, Op. 115
Fürst Constantin: Wo poch ich an (Lorch) 
Berlioz: Overture to Le roi Lear 
Beethoven: Symphony No. 5, Op. 67

 

6 April 1865 (Löwenberg)

Maurer: Symphony in F minor [No. 1, Op. 67]
Schumann: Overture to Braut von Messina 
Bach/Gounod: Meditation (Ave Maria) (Popper) 
Pergolesi: Air [Nina] (Popper) 
Kletzer: Rhapsodie hongroise [Op. 7] (Popper) 
Berlioz: Rackozy-Marsch from La damnation de Faust 
Glinka: Kamarinskaya 
Gade: Overture to Michel Angelo

 

23 April 1865 (Löwenberg)

Schumann: Symphony No. 1, Op. 38
Mozart: Overture to Zauberflöte 
Reichelt: Das Meer erglänzet weit hinaus (Lorch) 
[Seifriz]/Popper: Fantasie über Lieder des Fürsten [Op. 1] (Popper) 
Schubert: Zwei Lieder (Der Neugierige. Ungeduld) (Lorch) 
Spontini: Overture to Ferdinand Cortez

 

19 November 1865 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 1, Op. 21
Rubinstein: Faust 
Molique: Cello Concerto, Op. 45 (Popper) 
Gade: Overture to Im Hochland 
Wagner: Tristan und Isolde (Vorspiel and Liebestod)

 

17 December 1865 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Overture and 2 Lieder aus der Musik zu Egmont (Lorch) 
Popper: Cello Concerto No. 1 in D minor, Op. 8 (Popper) - world premiere
Weber: Overture to  Euryanthe 
Schubert: Symphony No. 7

 

4 February 1866 (Löwenberg) 

Gade: Overture to Hamlet  
Berlioz: La Captive (Lorch) 
Volkmann: Cello Concerto, Op. 33 (Popper) 
Cherubini: Overture to Der Wasserträger 
Schumann: Symphony No. 3, "Rhenish," Op. 97

 

18 February 1866 (Löwenberg)

Mendelssohn: Meeresstille und glückliche Fahrt 
Vieuxtemps: Violin Concerto No. 1, Op. 10 (Introduction and Rondo) (Frau Schmidt-Bydo) 
Liszt: Mignon (Lorch) 
Schumann: Frühlingsnacht (Lorch) 
Popper: Ich will meine Seele tauchen [Op. 2 No. 5] (Lorch) 
Ernst: Fantasie über Motive aus Othello, Op. 11 (Schmidt-Bydo) 
Berlioz: Carneval romain, Op. 9
Beethoven: Symphony No. 6, "Pastorale," Op. 68

 

18 March 1866 (Löwenberg)

Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 4, "Italian," Op. 90
Chopin: Piano Concerto No. 1 in E minor, Op. 11 (Topp) 
Weber: Overture to Der Beherrscher der Geister 
Liszt: La Campanella (Topp) 
Popper: Cello Concerto [No. 1 in D minor, Op. 8] (Popper) 
Liszt: Grande Polonaise in E major (Topp) 
Beethoven: Overture to Fidelio

 

September 1866 (Stuttgart, Hofkonzert)

Suite for 2 Cellos, Op. 16

 

25 November 1866 (Löwenberg)

Schumann: Symphony No. 3, "Rhenish," Op. 97
Berlioz: Overture to Waverley 
[Seifriz]/Popper: Fantasie über Lieder des Fürsten [Op. 1] (Popper) 
Schubert/Liszt: Zwei Lieder mit Orch. (Der Doppelgänger. Die junge Nonne) (Lorch) 
Liszt: Piano Concerto No. 1 (Topp) 
Spontini: Overture to Ferdinand Cortez

 

26 December 1866 (Löwenberg)

Mozart: Symphony in C major
Beethoven: Overture to Fidelio 
Boccherini/[Grützmacher]: Cello Concerto (Popper) 
Popper: Romanze [Op. 5] (Popper. Topp) 
Berlioz: Romeo et Juliette, Scherzo Die Fee Mab 
Mendelssohn: Nocturne from Sommernachtstraum
Weber: Overture to Euryanthe

 

31 December 1866 (Prague)

Mendelssohn: Piano Trio No. 2 in C minor, Op. 66

 

22 January 1867 (Zürich)

Pergolesi: Nina (Popper, Kirchner)
Popper: Romanze, Op. 5 (Popper, Kirchner)
Schumann: Abendlied from 6 Songs, Op. 107 (Popper, Kirchner)
Schumann: Piano Trio No. 2 in F major, Op. 80 (Hegar, Popper, Kirchner)

 

10 February 1867 (Löwenberg)

Volkmann: Symphony in D minor [No. 1, Op. 44]
Weber: Overture to Der Beherrscher der Geister 
Molique: Andante from Cello Concerto, Op. 45 (Popper) 
Popper: Maskenballscenen [Op. 3] (Popper) 
Schubert/Liszt: Reitermarsch 
Berlioz: La Captive (Lorch) 
Liszt: Mazeppa

 

31 March 1867 (Löwenberg)

Gade: Symphony No. 4, Op. 20
Mendelssohn: Overture "Meeresstille und glückliche Fahrt"
Popper: Sarabande und Gavotte [Op. 10] (Popper) 
Bach/Gounod/Popper: Meditation (Popper) 
Berlioz: Rackozy-Marsch 
Beethoven: Adagio from Symphony No. 9, Op. 125
Weber: Overture to Oberon

 

10 September 1867 (Vienna, Carltheater, organized by Ullmann)

Mendelssohn: Piano Trio No. 1 in D minor (mvts. 1 and 2), Op. 49 (Auer, Popper, Willmer)
Opera arias (Carlotta Patti)
Popper: Andante [Sarabande] and Gavotte, Op. 10 (Popper, Willmer)
Molique: [Andante] from Cello Concerto, Op. 45 (Popper, Willmer)
Popper: Warum and Papillon, Op. 3 (Popper, Willmer)
Schubert/Popper: Du bist die Ruch (Popper, Willmer)
Gounod: Serenade " Le Vallon" (Lefort, Popper)
Vieuxtemps: Ballade and Polonaise, Op. 38 (Auer, Willmer)
Spohr: Andante [from a concerto] (Auer, Willmer)
Paganini: Caprice [No. not given] (Auer)
Piano solos (Willmer)

 

15 December 1867 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 4, Op. 60
Marschner: Overture to Adolph von Nassau 
Schumann: Cello Concerto , Op. 129 (Popper) 
Seifriz: Fest-Gesang for Choir and Solos 
Schumann: Fest-Ouverture Op. 123

 

1 January 1868 (Löwenberg)

Mendelssohn: Hochzeitsmarsch from Sommernachtstraum 
Popper: Cello Concerto in D minor (Adagio) [Op. 8] (Popper) 
Servais: Morceau de Concert [Op. 14] (Popper) 
Spontini: Overture to Olympia 
Weber: Overture to Oberon 
Wagner: Tannhäuser Einzug der Gäste 
Rossini: Overture to Guillaume Tell

 

9 February 1868 (Löwenberg)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 8, Op. 93
Gade: Overture to Nachklänge an Ossian 
Molique: Andante from Cello Concerto, Op. 45 (Popper) 
Popper: Maskenball-Scenen [Op. 3] (Popper) 
Haydn: Variationen über Gott erhalte Franz 
Liszt: Les Preludes

 

15 March 1868 (Löwenberg)

Bülow: Des Sängers Fluch 
Händel: Theme and Variations in E major [The Harmonious Blacksmith] (Menter) 
Tausig: Soirees de Vienne No. 3 (Menter) 
Batta: Souvenir de Don Sébastien: Elégie, Op. 48 (Popper) 
Popper: Mazurka [Op. 11] (Popper) 
Piatti: Airs baskyrs, Op. 8 (Popper) 
Wagner: Prelude to Die Meistersinger
Beethoven: Symphony No. 2, Op. 36

 

13 April 1868 (Löwenberg)

Berlioz: Overture to Le roi Lear 
Liszt: Don Juan-Fantasie (Menter) 
Mendelssohn: Overture to Die schöne Melusine 
Mozart/Popper: Adagio [from String Quintet, K. 516] (Popper) 
Popper: Gavotte [Op. 10] (Popper) 
F. Kletzer: Ungarische Rhapsodie, Op. 7 (Popper) 
Chopin: Grande Polonaise precedee d'un Andante spianato, Op. 22 (Menter) 
Beethoven: Symphony No. 5, Op. 67

 

15 November 1868 (Vienna, Music Society)

Haydn: String Quartet in G major (Hellmesberger, Brodsky, Bachrich, Popper)
Beethoven: Piano Trio, Op. 70, No. 1 (Hellmesberger, Popper, Schenner)
Beethoven: String Quintet in C major Hellmesberger, Brodsky, Bachrich, Nigg, Popper)

 

3 December 1868 (Vienna, Philarmonic)

Esser: Symphony in B minor, Op. 79
Volkmann: Cello Concerto, Op. 33 (Popper. Esser)

 

14 March 1869 (Löwenberg)

Schumann: Symphony No. 2, Op. 61
Beethoven: Overture to Fidelio 
Popper: Romanze for Violoncello and Piano [Op. 5] (Peer) 
Berlioz: Romeo et Juliette, Part 1